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How does "Gattaca" By Andrew Niccol,relate to the concept of Belonging? Who...

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cmiranda5151 | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted January 4, 2009 at 3:41 AM via web

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How does "Gattaca" By Andrew Niccol,relate to the concept of Belonging?

Who is Forced to Belong? or not to Belong?

What is an example of Passive Belonging?

What is an example of Active Belonging?

Who needs to Belong? Who desires not to Belong?

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fuzzy91 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted May 30, 2009 at 4:30 PM (Answer #1)

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heya...

I am also doing Gattaca as one of my belonging texts... word of advice dont just ask the questions try to answer them.

I think the last quote at the end of the film pretty much hits the nail on the head!

however... we both no we have to go deeper than that. rather than me give you answers... why dont you jump onto the charles stuart university HSC online section... they have an awesome six step analysis you could do in relation to your texts... i have found them extremely helpful so take a look

 

 

=]

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lolli-x | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 14, 2010 at 1:31 PM (Answer #2)

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Quite simply, I concur with fuzzy91.

You can't simply choose a text without considering it's relation to belonging. If you can't think of anything it could to do with belonging, I suggest you choose something else instead of surfing the internet for the answers from another intelligent source.

For a 12th grade student, I know you can do better than that.

Well enough of my lecture, I'll give you some starting points to begin your search with belonging. If you're going to relate this text to a core text, write down the similarities between the two, or anything you think relates to belonging.

Then think of a thesis statement: Something the text is telling you about the concept of belonging. Weigh out if the thesis is valid enough to be backed up by a reasonable amount of evidence/techniques/whatnot and spontaneously write a mini-essay down; regardless how amazingly terrible it is, you can fix it up over time.

As insanely and stupidly simple as it sounds, it works with practice. Teachers honestly wouldn't give a damn whether you found something relating to 'passive' or 'active' belonging. If you can discover a thesis that connects with the text, and elaborate it to a deeper and sophisicated level of understanding with evidence, you might as well tell the examiner: "Damn straight it's right".

An important point to note: Don't treat this area of study like 'journey'. Journey has categories, whilst Belonging is a broader subject to explore, so take that into your advantage and discover something new before someone else takes a hold of it. Besides, categories are downright boring. :P

Hope this helps, and do some more self-discoveries the next time you're having trouble before asking someone else.

l o l l i. x

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