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How does the last sentence in the book Animal Farm explain the change that has occurred...

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saedgerton | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted August 6, 2012 at 3:31 PM via web

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How does the last sentence in the book Animal Farm explain the change that has occurred on the farm?

LAST SENTENCE: "No question now what has happened to the faces of the pigs. The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again: but already it was impossible to say which was which."

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shake99 | Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted August 6, 2012 at 6:14 PM (Answer #1)

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The last sentence in the book Animal Farm is

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.

This last line brings together the ideas that the pigs, who were able to take over possession and control of Animal Farm (eventually renaming it Manor Farm) have abandoned the principles of Animalism and have become so like the animals’ previous oppressors, human beings, that the animals can no longer tell the difference between them.

This illustrates Orwell’s themes that power tends to corrupt those who wield it, and that governments, when they are not checked by an educated and critical citizenry, will tend to become totalitarian.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted January 5, 2015 at 8:41 AM (Answer #2)

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If he acts like a man, talks like a man, thinks like a man, walks like a man, eats and drinks like a man, is he still a pig? In essence, Napoleon, Squealer and others have become as despotic as Farmer Jones. They have killed and starved the other animals, such as the hens and the sheep who were made to confess; the loyal Boxer was loaded in a truck headed to the Glue Factory and Snowball was probably killed after having been driven off. They have changed the commandments and rules to fit their desires. Even Mr. Pilkington notes in his congratulatory speech in the farmhouse that

...the lower animals on Animal Farm did more work and received less food than any other animals in the county. 

Pilkington goes on to say that between Animal Farm and the neighboring farmers, there should be no friction, no "clash of interests" whatsoever. Then, Napoleon stands and declares that his wish is to be in accord with the other farmers and "live in peace and conduct normal business" with these farmers whom he addresses as "Comrade."

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