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How do Lady Macbeth and Macbeth show their love for each other throughout the play?What...

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chris37 | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 6, 2012 at 1:35 AM via web

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How do Lady Macbeth and Macbeth show their love for each other throughout the play?

What are some examples throughout the play that display this? This could be through their support, protection, or sacrfices for each other? 

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted December 6, 2012 at 4:52 AM (Answer #2)

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Lady Macbeth relies on Macbeth for her status.  This is why she convinces him to kill Duncan.  Macbeth relies on Lady Macbeth to spur him along, as after all it is her plan that they use to commit the murder.  They are not really affectionate.  At times they refer to each other with "my love" type endearments, but often sarcastically or just as a general term of endearment.

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chris37 | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 6, 2012 at 5:30 PM (Answer #3)

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is there any way you could be more specific?

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted December 7, 2012 at 8:24 PM (Answer #4)

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The Macbeths show their love for one another mostly in the first two Acts because after that, they go their separate ways emotionally. By calling Macbeth, "Husband!" Lady Macbeth shows her support and love. Macbeth himself writes to his wife in a loving way with respectable tones and titles. After the murders happen, though, they tend to become less in love and more wrapped up in their own guilt; hence, they seem to fall out of love.

Sources:

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mwalter822 | Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted December 20, 2012 at 12:05 AM (Answer #5)

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I was never very impressed with the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Perhaps they love each other, but it isn't really very important in the play. When Lady Macbeth kills herself, Macbeth doesn't seem to be crushed. He isn't happy about it, but he seems to take it in stride. As post #4 says, they seem to be losing each other later in the play. That shows the destructive power of their guilt.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted January 24, 2013 at 8:21 AM (Answer #6)

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While they are misdirected, the Macbeths are a loving couple who try to compensate for the other's shortcomings.  For instance, Lady Macbeth assumes a stronger role when she perceives her husband's misgivings and anxieties.  She keeps a strong sedative and uses it so that she will seem calm; she may, in fact use it on Macbeth.  After Lady Macbeth commits suicide, Macbeth is disconsolate and speaks of the meaningless of life in his soliloquy.

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amitsingh11582 | College Teacher | Honors

Posted January 26, 2013 at 4:25 AM (Answer #7)

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There may be a series of love showing scene between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, like from the very beginning we see that Macbeth give too much importace to the words of his lady. At the time of Ghost scence at dinning table she gives her support to Macbeth when he saw the ghost.

At last, when Macbeth heard the news of the death of Lady Macbeth, he shows his sympathy in the terms that it is good in her favour, shows her love only. That she will not suffer any more. This is love...love of husband that he was uneasy due to the condition of Lady Macbeth.

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 30, 2013 at 1:16 PM (Answer #8)

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As some responders have already said, there seems to be little love between the Macbeths. They don't love anybody else, either. They are a couple of monsters. He enjoys killing people. That's what he's good at. She likes being married to a man who has high status and the potential for much higher status. She's much smarter than he is--and he knows it. She has to tell him what to do. At one point she has to tell him to wash his hands and put on his nightgown. After that banquet scene she drops out of sight. On his own, Macbeth makes a hash of running the kingdom because all he knows is brute force. Lady Macbeth makes an appearance near the end of the play because Shakespeare couldn't just leave her out completely. When she is reported dead, Macbeth apparently couldn't care less. People of their rank didn't typically marry for love in those days. They married for money, social status, family connections, and political power.

Love is kind of a funny thing in Shakespeare's plays. Othello loves Desdemona but he strangles her. Hamlet loves Ophelia but he does nothing but insult and frighten the poor girl, along with killing her father and brother. Lear thinks Goneril and Regan love him. Macbeth and his wife can't seem to produce any live children. Romeo and Juliet love each other, but they're awfully young, and they both kill themselves. In As You Like It, Orlando loves Rosalind, who is a girl being played by a man who is masquerading as a man pretending to be a girl--or something? And then there's Henry VIII.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 1, 2013 at 12:01 AM (Answer #9)

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Lady Macbeth does seem to care about Macbeth.  She does not just want to be queen.  She also wants to see him accomplish his ambitions.  When he does what she wants, she seems to really be in love with him.

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