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How does Iago manipulate Othello?

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sstewart27 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 13, 2007 at 1:14 AM via web

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How does Iago manipulate Othello?

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted December 13, 2007 at 3:09 AM (Answer #1)

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Like a true evil genius, Iago plays upon Othello's own fears and reinforces those fears with lies and innuendo (hints).  Iago manipulates the situation so that Cassio is in a position to ask Desdemona for aid.  He then stands by Othello's side, professing concern for his friend, and questioning Desdemona's fidelity because she spoke for Cassio.  By stealing Desdemona's handkerchief, Iago is able to plant it on Cassio and provide evidence for his lies.  Finally, Iago arranges for Othello to overhear a conversation between himself and Cassio so that Othello believes he is hearing a confession.  It all works.  Othello gives in to his fears and his natural jealousy and he kills the woman he loves. 

Most blame Iago for his duplicitious behavior, but some blame should also be laid upon Othello, who chose not to handle the situation with calm reason.

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sagetrieb | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted December 13, 2007 at 8:25 PM (Answer #2)

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Act 3 Scene 3 is known as “the seduction scene” (or “the manipulation scene”) because here Iago tricks Othello into believing that Desdemona is having a love affair with Cassio.  Iago and Othello enter just before Cassio leaves, hearing the tail-end of the conversation. Iago says, “Ha! I like not that.,”  which triggers a back and forth repartee between Iago and Othello that is like a dance:  Iago drops a hint or uses a tone suggesting a relationship between Desdemona and Cassio, Othello asks what he means by the comment, Iago then demurs, only for Othello to demand more information, seemingly dragging it out of Iago while all the while it is Iago leading this dance.  Iago’s skills at manipulation result in tremendous irony, for we the audience know what Iago is up to, but Othello seems like a dupe in not understanding what seems to us obvious manipulation.

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yamas321 | Student | eNoter

Posted April 12, 2011 at 4:45 AM (Answer #3)

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by lying throughout

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