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In Morte d'Arthur, how does the description of Sir Lucan's death contrast with the...

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sleeps | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 3, 2010 at 12:06 PM via web

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In Morte d'Arthur, how does the description of Sir Lucan's death contrast with the speech in which Arthur bemoans his passing?

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dstuva | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted February 3, 2010 at 11:18 PM (Answer #1)

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I'm not sure "contrast" is an accurate word to use to compare Sir Lucan's death with Arthur's speech bemoaning his loss.  Arthur points out an irony, if that's what you mean.  Lucan is already mortally wounded when he tries to help Arthur to his feet.  When Arthur swoons, Lucan, "in the lifting," swoons himself and "part of his guts fell out of his body,..."  Then his "heart burst."  When Arthur wakes up, he sees Lucan "foaming at the mouth and part of his guts lay at his feet."  Arthur points out the irony that Lucan tried to help Arthur, when he was really in more need of help himself.  Lucan's heart was dedicated to helping Arthur, which led to Lucan's own heart bursting from the effort.  Arthur sees Lucan's act as noble, which presumably it was.  I don't see any real contrast.

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