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How do you use technology to teach reading and/or writing to yor students?How do you...

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desousam | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 11, 2010 at 8:46 AM via web

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How do you use technology to teach reading and/or writing to yor students?

How do you use technology to teach reading and/or writing to yor students?

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 11, 2010 at 8:53 AM (Answer #2)

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One very simple thing I love using technology for is writing on Microsoft Word.  I've found the spell-check to be something that actually enhances student confidence in writing (not the auto-correct, but the red squiggle).  Younger high school students (freshman mostly) and then of course elementary and middle school students tend to get so bogged down with SPELLING.  It is difficult to teach high school students to "freewrite" without worry about spelling - they don't want to go on if they think there is a mistake in their work.

One semester I took my 9th graders to the computer lab once a week just to type their journals.  As they got more comfortable typing, I found they actually wrote MORE when typing than handwriting (go figure).

I've also used several online grammar game sights for quick computer mini-lessons that were good about drilling basic skills, which at the high school level, should be there.

Another thing I like to do (especially with older students) is have kids do "poster presentations" using PowerPoint.  I think it is a good introduction into the technological world and usually the final product is better than handwritten posters.

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celtic1108 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted August 11, 2010 at 6:23 PM (Answer #3)

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I, myself, am not a huge fan of technology. What happened to the days of finding pleasure in breaking the binding of brand new book and inhaling the new-book smell? No, now we have Kindels and ebooks that are slowly destroying my beautiful print books. While I may dislike technology, I cannot entierly remove it from my teching--especially since I teach at a career college.

I teach on-line blended classes, so students are forced to become familiar with the internet and email. These classes are generally composition classes, so I work with editing software a lot. I have a tutorial on everything that Word can do. I also use Breeze to record lectures so students may watch them when they have the time. I use discussion boards a lot too.

For my traditional classes, I teach email etiquette. No one knows how to send a proper email anymore--did anyone? I also use PowerPoints to get the visual learners. I know that I use technology more, but I cannot think of them right now. I know that if you sat down, you too would realize all the sneaky ways that you use technology as a teaching tool.

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asorrell | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted August 12, 2010 at 8:14 AM (Answer #4)

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I use a class website and post all my assignments, extra resources, etc.  I post pdf files of just about every handout, so kids can download them if they lose them.  Students use this a lot for their vocab lists or descriptions of major projects.

When we read a books or stories, I try to find online full text versions that I can post on my website for kids to access. For example, there's a full text pdf version of Lord of the Flies available online, so kids have no excuses if they forget their books at school and need to read at home.  In many of my assignments, I require the students to support with specific passages, so students use the Control - F (find) feature along with the pdf file to find what they're looking for.  For example, in one assignment, they were looking for imagery of specific things in the novel, so they could use Control-F and then type in "conch" or something from the novel, so they would immediately be taken to all references to "conch".  I use this myself quite a bit when looking for a specific line in Shakespeare, etc.

I also love to find free audio versions of novels online to at least introduce kids to books.  There is a fantastic audio version of the first few pages of Fahrenheit 451 that we listen to at the beginning of the book that gets kids hooked.

I also use online flashcards for students to study their vocab works.  There are lots of sites where you can create flashcards and then post the link.

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susan3smith | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted August 12, 2010 at 10:46 AM (Answer #5)

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I  use the LCD to do oral quizzes.  I copy and paste quotations from the works they were assigned to read, one per slide in a powerpoint presentation, and call on students (especially those whose hands are not up), to give information and significance of the quotation.  My students are very positive in their response to this.  It puts students on the spot, holds them accountable for their reading, emphasizes key passages, provokes discussion, and best of all there are no papers to grade.  It is easy to determine who has read and who has not. 

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hadley818 | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted August 14, 2010 at 5:50 PM (Answer #6)

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We use Moodle at my school. We have one-on-one computer labs in most of the English classrooms (which is a great luxury). The students come in, do their grammar bell work on Moodle, and begin the class period with a writing prompt. Since teachers can give feedback quickly and many students prefer to type rather than hand-write their responses, more students end up actually finishing their assignments. Moodle is also great for discussions over in-class readings and homework since students love that type of interactive format.

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boryung | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted August 16, 2010 at 3:05 AM (Answer #7)

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I started tutoring only a few months ago, so I wouldn't say that I've had a lot of opportunities to use technology as I teach, but so far I've often had to use the Internet to find answers to puzzling questions. I've also made good use of SparkNotes to find good summaries for hard books to help my students understand what they're reading better.

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 22, 2010 at 6:30 PM (Answer #8)

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I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE using a document camera to teach writing. My pre-writing routine for 9th graders is pretty dependent on an adapted Jane Schaffer t-chart. As I take students through the experience of brainstorming what they think about a quote as they connect it to a topic this has been an invaluable tool. It works much like the old fashioned overhead projector, but I need to sit at a desk to operate it. It becomes a community task that we work on together. When we are finished, I have a document that can be captured and uploaded onto my website, made copies of for special needs students, or just hung onto for future reference.

Having students watch editing and revising a paper has made them more driven proofreaders.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 23, 2010 at 7:40 AM (Answer #9)

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We all use technology in our teaching all the time; if you don't think so, keep the computer off for a day and see how helpless you feel.  On a more general note, we use edline to keep parents apprised of their students' progress.  It's less of a hassle than I thought it might be, and it's a good incentive to stay current with grading.  Keeps me from making as many calls or writing as many e-mails--always a good thing, it seems to me. 

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spark73 | Elementary School Teacher | eNoter

Posted August 24, 2010 at 3:52 PM (Answer #10)

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In my classroom we are fortunate to have a laptop cart for the students.  We use technology all over the place in all content areas.  In reading we use a site that has books virtually with comprehension questions, quizzes, and the option to record his/her reading to check for fluency.  The kids love it and can access it from home, which helps those who may not have level appropriate reading materials. In writing we use everything from word, to Kidspiration, PowerPoint.

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lclasson | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 2, 2010 at 6:50 AM (Answer #11)

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How do you use technology to teach reading and/or writing to yor students?

How do you use technology to teach reading and/or writing to yor students?

I discovered a new thingthis summer at a training called Googledoc (dots.google.com).  Students can create documents at this Web site and form peer groups.  They can participate in collaborative writing and editing on the computer.  From my experience, I find students are eager to type on the computer and the fact that they can share what they are working and and get and give instant feedback while they are working is great.  It can also be accessed at home through the Internet.  I find students become better editors when they work on editing the work of their peers.  They also become more concerned about their own writing and try to make fewer mistakes.  I like to have them keep an error list all semester so that they can keep track of the errors that they need to work on.  As a teacher, you can attach yourself to all of your student's documents and give them feedback at any time.  It's a great way to work on the teaching of writing.

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lclasson | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 2, 2010 at 6:54 AM (Answer #12)

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Excuse me, but the previous post to not up-load my corrections.  Here is the one that should have uploaded. 

I discovered a new thing this summer at a training called Googledoc (dots.google.com).  Students can create documents at this Web site and form peer groups.  They can participate in collaborative writing and editing on the computer.  From my experience, I find students are eager to type on the computer and the fact that they can share what they are working on and get and give instant feedback while they are working is great.  It can also be accessed at home through the Internet.  I find students become better editors when they work on editing the work of their peers.  They also become more concerned about their own writing and try to make fewer mistakes.  I like to have them keep an error list all semester so that they can keep track of the errors that they need to work on.  As a teacher, you can attach yourself to all of your student's documents and give them feedback at any time.  It's a great way to work on the teaching of writing.

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sherryll | College Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted September 20, 2010 at 4:46 PM (Answer #13)

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I am a college professor, and I use very little technology to teach literature.  On occasion, I use films that are in some way a major addition to the information students need to understand fully a work.  I taught a grad course on Austen last year and rather than assigning all six novels, I showed films of two novels and we read four.

I also use MS Word track changes.  If students send me a document, I can use that tool to make comments, correct grammar/spelling.  Very effective and efficient.

In general, I have found over the course of my career that it is the human interaction of discussion is the most effective way of teaching two things:  the first is the topic/discipline; the other thing I always teach, no matter which course, is how to have an academic discussion without the student feeling stupid.  In general, students are not eager to be wrong, and so a safe academic environment is essential in order to teach the art of discourse.

 

 

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gusman816 | Middle School Teacher | eNoter

Posted September 21, 2010 at 1:22 PM (Answer #14)

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How do you use technology to teach reading and/or writing to yor students?

How do you use technology to teach reading and/or writing to yor students?

  My school was fortunate enough to get access this year to a program called Write Online.  It allows teachers to embed instructions, word banks, sentence starters, etc. to facilitate the writing process for students who struggle with written expresion.  Our students can access the program from home with a password provided by the school.  You can learn more from the company's website; it really is a great tool.

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melvin900 | eNoter

Posted September 27, 2010 at 1:52 AM (Answer #15)

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Thanks for taking the time to discuss about technology, I feel strongly about it and love learning more on this topic. If possible, as you gain expertise, would you mind updating your thread with more information? It is extremely helpful for me.

 

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sharonelin | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 10, 2010 at 6:53 AM (Answer #16)

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There are countless free Web 2.0 sites useful in teaching. (Web 2.0 = websites that are interactive; viewers can create and post material on the sites). They're effective in getting students engaged because they're interactive; students can post their work online and interact with other students who do the same.

Posters: Glogster.com One of the most useful Web 2.0 sites I've used includes http://www.glogster.com, where students can create multi-layered posters about an assigned topic. The design tools for the "glogs" [graphic blogs] include a variety of options for colors, styles, backgrounds and animated flourishes. Students can embed images and YouTube videos, provide active links to websites, and move elements around in various configurations. Teachers can get an educational account and provide students with usernames and passwords that are protected and private; otherwise, students sign up with their email accounts.

Word Study/Writing: Tagxedo or Wordle Awesome for English class -- create a "word cloud" design that arranges key words used in a passage or a list. Students can create a design using words from a document or by simply typing words into a text box. Repeated words become larger in the design (Great for showing overused words in their own essays or for pointing out recurring themes in passages or speeches). Tagxedo allows you to save your image to your computer; Wordle only allows you to post in their gallery but provides a URL address.

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