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How do you draw a proper reflection through curved mirrors?

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niharadane | Student, Grade 11 | eNoter

Posted January 12, 2012 at 3:25 PM via web

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How do you draw a proper reflection through curved mirrors?

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lakshanigunathilake | Student , Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 24, 2012 at 3:42 PM (Answer #1)

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follow the rules in reflection.then it is easy for you.

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kartick | Student , Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted February 22, 2012 at 12:37 AM (Answer #2)

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you first have to go through the law of reflection and then the rules how to draw the diagram.

 

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kawedding | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted March 16, 2012 at 11:18 PM (Answer #4)

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Here's a more complete answer:

1) Draw a line perpendicular to the curved surface of the mirror, through the center.  This is called the principle axis.  The point where it touches the mirror is called the vertex.  Measure and mark the focal point.  Measure and draw the object in position on top of the principle axis.

2)  Assuming this is a concave mirror and your object is not in front of the focal point (the rules are still the same for a concave mirror and for the in-front-of-the-focal-point situation but it is a bit more complex), draw a line from the top of the object, parallel to the principle axis, to the mirror's surface.

3) The reflected ray will go from the point where it touched the mirror, through the focal point.  Draw this.

4) The second ray is drawn from the top of the object through the focal point to touch the mirror.

5) The reflected ray for this is drawn from the mirror parallel to the principle axis.

6) The point where the two REFLECTED rays intersect is where the top of the image lies.  The rest of the object falls to the principle axis.  If the object is beyond the focal point, the image will be upside down.  This is called a real image.  It can be enlarged or reduce.

7) When the object is at the focal point, no image is formed.

8) When the object is in front of the focal point, a virtual or right side up, enlarged image is formed.

To see these ray diagrams, go to:  http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/refln/u13l3d.cfm

Sources:

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suvetha | Student , Undergraduate | Valedictorian

Posted April 9, 2012 at 9:04 AM (Answer #5)

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1. Pick a point on the top of the object and draw two incident rays traveling towards the mirror.

Using a straight edge, accurately draw one ray so that it passes exactly through the focal point on the way to the mirror. Draw the second ray such that it travels exactly parallel to the principal axis. Place arrowheads upon the rays to indicate their direction of travel.

 

 

2. Once these incident rays strike the mirror, reflect them according to the two rules of reflection for concave mirrors.

The ray that passes through the focal point on the way to the mirror will reflect and travel parallel to the principal axis. Use a straight edge to accurately draw its path. The ray that traveled parallel to the principal axis on the way to the mirror will reflect and travel through the focal point. Place arrowheads upon the rays to indicate their direction of travel. Extend the rays past their point of intersection.

 

3. Mark the image of the top of the object.

The image point of the top of the object is the point where the two reflected rays intersect. If your were to draw a third pair of incident and reflected rays, then the third reflected ray would also pass through this point. This is merely the point where all light from the top of the object would intersect upon reflecting off the mirror. Of course, the rest of the object has an image as well and it can be found by applying the same three steps to another chosen point. (See note below.)

 

 

4. Repeat the process for the bottom of the object.

The goal of a ray diagram is to determine the location, size, orientation, and type of image that is formed by the concave mirror. Typically, this requires determining where the image of the upper and lower extreme of the object is located and then tracing the entire image. After completing the first three steps, only the image location of the top extreme of the object has been found. Thus, the process must be repeated for the point on the bottom of the object. If the bottom of the object lies upon the principal axis (as it does in this example), then the image of this point will also lie upon the principal axis and be the same distance from the mirror as the image of the top of the object. At this point the entire image can be filled in.
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astrosonu | Student | Valedictorian

Posted July 28, 2012 at 5:31 AM (Answer #6)

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