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How could I argue the class distinctions?We're writing a paper in which we had to find...

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gotwake5 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 28, 2007 at 3:41 AM via web

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How could I argue the class distinctions?

We're writing a paper in which we had to find two articles about our assigned topic, mine being "class distinction". The articles also had to be talking about class distinction in "A Rose for Emily". Then in the paper we are supposed to make an argument about our topic. Is this confusing you as much as it is me? I'm about ready to drop the class and just take an F.

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cmcqueeney | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted October 28, 2007 at 4:51 AM (Answer #1)

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One way you could argue class distinctions would be to compare what Miss Emily was compared with what she is.  Miss Emily used to be apart of one of the town's wealthiest and most prominent families.  The first few paragraphs discuss this idea.  Her house is described as one that is out of fashion now, but it was considered beautiful and it had been on the "most select street" in town.  Her family was excused from ever paying taxes.  The entire town considers her a "monument" because she has outlived her wealth and status.  They are respectful of her past, but her status us changed so much they don't know what to do with her now.  

At the time of the beginning of the story, Miss Emily lives alone with only one servant.  Her status is deteriorated because she never married.  She runs around with Homer Barron - behavior not fitting of a lady.  Her house smells and is surrounded by gas pumps and run down buildings. 

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