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How is Boo Radley a mockingbird?How is Boo Radley a mockingbird? How does pleasing the...

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kayzar-dharsi | eNoter

Posted March 15, 2012 at 1:47 AM via web

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How is Boo Radley a mockingbird?

How is Boo Radley a mockingbird?

How does pleasing the children with gifts make him a mockingbird?

Also, what does saving have to do with being a mockingbird?

 

6 Answers | Add Yours

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 15, 2012 at 1:59 AM (Answer #2)

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What makes him a mockingbird is that he is a victim of society's prejudice, but he is basically a sweet, gentle man.  He looks out for the children and leaves him gifts, and this speaks to his good heart.  He is also brave, and the children seem to make him more brave.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 15, 2012 at 2:02 AM (Answer #3)

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A mockingbird is something that does no wrong to others and yet is helpless and tends to get abused by others.  At least that's how the term is used in the book.  Boo has never hurt anyone outside his family and yet he has been demonized and made into a monster.

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kayzar-dharsi | eNoter

Posted March 15, 2012 at 2:08 AM (Answer #4)

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What makes him a mockingbird is that he is a victim of society's prejudice, but he is basically a sweet, gentle man.  He looks out for the children and leaves him gifts, and this speaks to his good heart.  He is also brave, and the children seem to make him more brave.

Thank you but i have one more question.

 

How is he a 'mockingbird' by saving Jem and Scout?

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 15, 2012 at 6:08 AM (Answer #5)

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In answer to your third post, Boo represents goodness and innocence, like the mockingbird. By defending the children, who are likewise good and innocent, from the evil Bob Ewell, he saves their lives--lives that can continue for years to come. Of course, by killing Bob, Boo has also lost his innocence, and though it was in self-defense and preserved the lives of others, it can be argued that he no longer fits the definition of a mockingbird.

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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted March 15, 2012 at 6:15 AM (Answer #6)

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Boo Radley is a sweet, gentle, innocent man. That is what makes him a mockingbird. We first learn that Boo has been misjudged by society when he leaves gifts for the children. Leaving the gifts doesn't make him a mockingbird, but it does show his true nature to the reader. The same could be said for the event where he saves Jem and Scout. Boo was described by the townsfolk as a violent man. The violence against the children that Boo prevents shows his true nature by comparison and juxtaposition. We see that Boo is a mockingbird becasue of the contrast with Bob Ewell. Although he kills Mr. Ewell, it was not out of malice but an accident. Boo then carries Jem gently all the way home and stays with him to make sure he is alright. The two events (giving the children gifts and saving Jem) do not make Boo a mockingbird, they simply reveal it to the reader.
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lsumner | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted March 18, 2012 at 9:31 AM (Answer #7)

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As stated in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird, no one should harm a mockingbird because all it does is sing and bring beauty in the lives of those it encounters. In one way, Boo is like a mockingbird. He would not harm you. He is a gentle, caring man who loves the children. He is interpreted as a monster by some, but Jem and Scout never see that side of him. He showers the children with gifts and even saves their lives when they are attacked by Bob Ewell. Jem and Scout only see Boo as a mockingbird who is innocent and giving.

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