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Hello! Could you please tell me the literal and symbolic or metaphorical meaning of...

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coutelle | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted March 27, 2013 at 8:42 PM via web

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Hello! Could you please tell me the literal and symbolic or metaphorical meaning of "suggestiveness" and "comment" in this excerpt of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, chapter 8?

 

For Daisy was young and her artificial world was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful snobbery and orchestras which set the rhythm of the year, summing up the sadness and suggestiveness of life in new tunes. All night the saxophones wailed the hopeless comment of the Beale Street Blues while a hundred pairs of golden and silver slippers shuffled the shining dust.

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 27, 2013 at 9:13 PM (Answer #1)

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The paragraph from which this excerpt is taken is describing Daisy in the months after Gatsby had left for the war. She had thought she was passionately in love with him while he was still with her, but once he was gone, Daisy "was young" and unsure of herself and her feelings. Her life was built on superficial pleasures and "pleasant, cheerful snobbery." There was very little that was solid and definite about her attitude or her actions - the lyrics of popular jazz tunes could describe her life.

Some of the words to "Beale Street Blues" read:

I'd rather be here than any place I know...It's gonna take the sergeant for to make me go...Goin' to the river and there's a reason why, because the river's wet and Beale Street's done gone dry.

The music playing in the background of Daisy's life could suggest saddness, could suggest lost love, could suggest an empty life - literally, as Daisy looked for someone or something to give her life meaning, or metaphorically as a comment on the lifestyle of many in society during the Jazz Age era in which The Great Gatsby is set.

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