I have to watch How I Met Your Mother "Perfect Week" (Season 5 Episode 14). Could someone tell me how is this a distortion from god's original plan for sex?

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I think that there are some initial assumtions present here that have to be analyzed.  On one hand, the invoking of the divine in the "gods' original plan" is a challenging element.  This is simply too broad.  The question of which form of the divine interpretation, how to divine the will of the gods', and what evidence is being used to construct such an idea are all elemental here.  At the same time, the implication is that the show is presenting something against the will of the divine, which might not be the intent of the show in the first place.  Having said all of this, I think that we can examine some level of unhealthy sexual behavior in the show's episode.  The entire notion of a "perfect week" is one in which Barney is using sex as a means to an end as opposed to the end in its own right.  Sex as conquest is a form of power, almost a form of compulsion.  This helps to establish an unhealthy sexual pattern and behavior.  The fact that this "perfect week" is something that is cheered and praised, by both friends and society, in the form of Jim Nantz, is another example of how priorities are out of sync with what should be in terms of sexual health and sexual ethics.  The idea of being able to sleep with as many women as possible for a man and being praiseworthy for this is something that might also break from what can be considered a healthy and grounded approach to sexual activity.  This same behavior in women is socially designed to criticize her behavior, indicating again that the episode's premise as to what defines "a perfect week" might go very far to express a notion of sex that is either unhealthy or counter to the aims of a harmonious social construction.


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