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If the gravitational constant varies, how can it be considered constant?This article...

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truthseekah | Salutatorian

Posted January 24, 2013 at 6:46 PM via web

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If the gravitational constant varies, how can it be considered constant?

This article sheds light on variations observed in the gravitational constant (G). Please discuss how a changing "constant" can survive and the effects it may have on science.

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truthseekah | Salutatorian

Posted January 24, 2013 at 6:49 PM (Answer #2)

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http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/dr-rupert-sheldrake/how-the-gravitational-constant-varies_b_2479456.html

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted January 24, 2013 at 8:03 PM (Answer #3)

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The truth is that it is not really constant, we just pretend it is.  We are talking about scientific experiments and laboratory measurements.  Sometimes they can become kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Despite these variations, most scientists take it for granted that the constants themselves are really constant; the variations in their values are simply the result of experimental errors. (huffington post)

In order to study the natural world, we have to make some assumptions.  However, we have to remember that we are making these assumptions so we do not end up kidding ourselves.  We are trying to understand complex processes, and the only way to do that is to try to simplify them so that they can come closer to the realm of our understanding.  That’s why I hate physics.

Sources:

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truthseekah | Salutatorian

Posted January 24, 2013 at 9:34 PM (Answer #4)

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I understand what you are saying, however, metrologists have been fudging the numbers to suit themselves.  The constant is given a number with a narrow plus or minus. Different labs are recording numbers outside this range which may be different at various times of day or days of the year. Then a new constant is generated many times outside the previous degree of error.  But, instead of taking into consideration a majority of the data to create a wider degree of error, the degree of error becomes more narrow.  This is what makes no sense.


Instead of following observation which seems to be showing that G is variable and not constant, metrologists record what they assume to be true based on what they were taught (G is constant).  Rather than be excited about exploring what would cause a fluctuation, many find it easier to resort to dogma.

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