Favorite CharacterWho is your favorite character?

8 Answers | Add Yours

sagetrieb's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

I like Miss Maudie. Miss Maudie takes out her teeth to show Scout; she gives her cake; she tells her about her father; she wears men's overall, which must have been a great comfort to Scout.  On the one hand she is earthy and unpretentious, and on the other she understands life and human relationships--she's smart. She also understands Atticus, and often it is through her that we understand him better, too, for Scout's point of view never quite allows the perspective Aunt Maudie provides.  And best of all, I like Maudie when her house burns down, for though that must upset her enormously--her house is gone--she does not fall apart or even complain, but merely starts over again.  I admire such strength.  And she is a woman on her own--that too, notches her up as a role model for Scout--and for me as well.

gbeatty's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #3)

Favorite Character

Who is your favorite character?

My favorite character is Atticus. My father is just as quiet as Atticus, and in many ways he is as good a man. However, he is a gentle man, and as a teenager I had an intense fantasy of him stepping up to do something traditionally manly, as Atticus does when he shoots the dog. I was so jealous of Atticus.



meowmix's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #4)

Calpurnia.  I admire the way she is able to float between two worlds: Coloured and White.  When Cal switches dialects, it reminds me how my mother is like that.  She would have her proper speech (silted due to the lack of her English vocabulary) and her "emotional" speech (Lots of Chinese when she is feeling strongly about something.)  Just like Miss Maudie, Cal can be honest about things to Scout and makes sure it is still at a level Scout can understand.

renelane's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #5)

Atticus is my favorite. When I read this novel as a girl, I fell  in love with the tragic-romantic idea of Atticus as the single father fighting for justice. I could never imagine him cursing a t a car engine, or yelling at Scout for leaving her bike in the driveway. His patient discussions with his children were unbelievable to me. He respected that his children had their own thoughts and ideas about things. My father always treated me like his baby (still does), and while that was nice, Atticus was my dream man.

asorrell's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #6)

I always tell my students that I admire Atticus because he did the right thing even when other people thought he was wrong.  If you can do that in life, you'll go far.  As a father, he's incredible.  I always like that he always answers the questions Scout ask him.  He never says, I'll tell you when you're older, which would be the easy thing to do.  He always answers truthfully.

ajmchugh's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #7)

I find it very difficult to choose a favorite character from this novel.  I grew up knowing that Atticus Finch was my father's favorite character in all of literature, and I can obviously see why.  But like meowmix, I love Calpurnia.  I think that her role in the children's lives is more important than they realize, and I am always impressed by how consistent she and Atticus are when it comes to teaching the children right from wrong.  It really is like she's a member of the family--for so many different reasons.

accessteacher's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #8)

Atticus Finch has to be my favourite. I love the fact that he is such a good father - he makes his children think that they are beating him in the games they play, whereas all the time he is a better player. His act of standing up for what he feels is right, even when it causes danger to both him and his family, is admirable and noble.

fabian846's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #9)

I like Atticus Finch, he defended Tom Robinson though he knew that he will never win against the white men because of racism and prejudice but still he pushes a lot of effort to prove that Tom is not guilty. And I like the way they call him "sir" by his children it such a moral thing.


We’ve answered 288,008 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question