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Ezra Pound Poetry I'm looking for the analysis for the poem "Statement of Being." ...

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njessup | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted March 4, 2012 at 6:37 AM via web

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Ezra Pound Poetry

I'm looking for the analysis for the poem "Statement of Being."  Anyone know where I could find it online?  I've tried to find one and did not have any success. 

 

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 4, 2012 at 7:04 AM (Answer #2)

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Do you know when the poem was published? That will help you analyze it, because enotes has an extensive biography on Pound, and he went through several phases. This poem is interesting because it is about poetry, and I love the chicken metaphor.
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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 4, 2012 at 2:48 PM (Answer #3)

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I'm wondering why you don't just post it as a question. You have a membership so you can post as many questions as you like. The poem is a short one and I would expect that one of us could probably help you out. We have quite a few of editors here at eNotes that absolutely LOVE poetry. (I am one.) I make no promises, but it might be worth putting it out there and getting some help if you cannot find it. If you post it and no one answers it before me, contact me with the URL address and I'll jump in!

I think it would be fun, and shouldn't take too long.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 4, 2012 at 5:06 PM (Answer #4)

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Ditto #3. I am another poetry lover that would love to respond to such a question. You might find it beneficial to repost this but as a specific question rather than a discussion. If you can't find the information you are looking for on the internet, it is always a good idea to see if you can find it in a different way, and using the editors on enotes to help you do this would be a great start.

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e-martin | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 5, 2012 at 3:23 AM (Answer #5)

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If you can't find analysis on this particular poem, maybe you can look for some more general criticism on Ezra Pound, which eNotes offers, or look for discussion on the particular techniques used in this poem.

Imagery, conceit, irony and contrast are some of the techniques used in this short poem which seems to make a comment on the beauty of poetry as an anachronism of the human world, which is, well, not so great, according to the attitude of this poem.

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belarafon | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 5, 2012 at 2:54 PM (Answer #6)

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Well, here's the poem: it's fairly short, so we should be able to give it some thought here.

Statement of Being
by Ezra Pound

I am a grave poetic hen
That lays poetic eggs
And to enhance my temperament
A little quiet begs.

We make the yolk philosophy,
True beauty the albumen.
And then gum on a shell of form
To make the screed sound human.

My non-poetic mind goes straight to the literal interpretation; Pound compares himself to a hen, creating his work as the hen lays eggs. Each part of an egg serves a vital purpose, and so each part of Pound's writing serves its purpose in turn, from the form and meter to the language.

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lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted March 6, 2012 at 7:11 AM (Answer #7)

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The second stanza really gets to all the parts of the egg and then makes the ultimate point of the poem. The yolk is the "life" of the egg, it's most essential part so he says it is the "philosophy" or the meaning of the poem, but in order to convey that idea, it must be surrounded by the (pretty) words of the poem, or the albumen. The albumen also "feeds" the yolk as the egg matures into the chick. In this way, the words feed the reader that ideas of the poem. Finally, the poem must have a logical form of some sort, traditionally lines and stanzas, so that is the outer shell which "contains" the words and ideas. Without all of these components, the poem would not come together as a single unit with a poetic purpose.

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