Where does Simon go at the end of Chapter 3 of Lord of the Flies?

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jseligmann | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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Simon went off to be alone. I see Simon as the most curious and aware of all the children on the island. He doesn't have the grown-up, scientific sense of Piggy or the political strength or awareness of Ralph, but he is smart in a more general sense. He has gone away to be alone with himself on this island... to sense what it means to be there, what it smells like and looks like and feels like... to be one with an island surrounded by a vast sea and to understand it like no one else.

He came at last to a place where more sunshine fell. Since they had not so far to go for light the creepers had woven a great mat that hung at the side of an open space in the jungle; for here a patch of rock came close tothe surface and would not allow more than little plants and ferns to grow.

The whole space was walled with dark aromatic bushes, and was a bowl of heat and light. A great tree, fallen across one corner, leaned against the trees that still stood and a rapid climber flaunted red and yellow sprays right to the top.

Simon paused. He looked over his shoulder as Jack had done at the close ways behind him and glanced swiftly round to confirm that he was utterly alone. For a moment his movements were almost furtive. Then he bent down and wormed his way into the center of the mat. The creepers and the bushes were so close that he left his sweat on them and they pulled together behind him. When he was secure in the middle he was in a little cabin screened off from the open space by a few leaves. He squatted down, parted the leaves and looked out into the clearing.

Nothing moved but a pair of gaudy butterflies that danced round each other in the hot air. Holding his breath he cocked a critical ear at the sounds of the island. Evening was advancing toward the island; the sounds of the bright fantastic birds, the bee-sounds, even the crying of the gulls that were returning to their roosts among the square rocks, were fainter.

The deep sea breaking miles away on the reef made an undertone less perceptible than the susurration of the blood.


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