I don't understand the poem "Falling Song" by Daniel David Moses. Can someone please help me?In the poem "Falling Song" by Daniel David Moses, what are some poetic devices used...

I don't understand the poem "Falling Song" by Daniel David Moses. Can someone please help me?

In the poem "Falling Song" by Daniel David Moses, what are some poetic devices used in the story? Also, how does this poem make you feel? What is it really about for you?

Here's the poem itself for those of you who can't find it...

There was the sweet but reedy
honking of geese coming down
this morning with rain over
rush hour streets, coming
through like bells that celebrate.

I got right up, pushing up
close to the sooty window
pane. I peered out and up through
the weather, imagining
that that line of winged dots would

be shifting as if waves moved
easily through them, as if
waves floated them south. I wanted
to catch them riding, spots on
the wake of the wind, marking

the certain direction of
their migration. But I got
no satisfaction. Mist kept
them mysterious, quickly
dampening their call. Leaning

over the sill, I gaped at
a window shade dull sky, at
a hollow city, and felt
like I'd missed a parade I
would have wanted to follow.

I don't think I've completely grasped the concept and/or message of the poem. Can someone help me?

Thanks in advance =)

If you have any websites that can help me understand this poem, please post them with your answer! =) Thanks again!

Here's the poem:

2 Answers | Add Yours

reidalot's profile pic

reidalot | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

"Falling Song" is a Canadian native poem that glorifies nature as personified by the geese who fly through the city "like bells that celebrate." The simile of the geese to the bells illuminates the imagery later in the poem when the first person narrator feels as if "I'd missed a parade." It is a a celebratory event when the geese appear through the weather and the narrator wishes "to follow" out of the city that is filled with the images of dreariness illustrated by the "rush hour streets," sooty windows, and "a window shade dull sky." This poem is fairly easy to understand: picture yourself in a large city on a dreary, rainy day filled with humanity and grime. Then, you see geese flying south, and recall the beauty of nature and the pleasure of taking a journey, to a sunnier, warmer climate. Wouldn't you, too, want to follow? For more information on the poet go to his website.

pmiranda2857's profile pic

pmiranda2857 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

"The reader senses a struggle to attain self-knowledge as if Moses is feeling his way through the contradictions and puzzles of his life. Individual in both style and thought, possessing a striking original sensibility and a probing intelligence, Moses is an arresting poet."   

The poem is about the flight of geese, that the author celebrates with longing. 

The city where he lives obscures his view of the geese as they fly in formation through the misty sky.  He marvels at their purposeful flying, and the wonder of how the birds know their destination. 

Their instincts and the patterns that they make in the sky impress him.  He wants to follow them, in the simplicity of their flight for survival.  For him it is so joyous to see these birds, it is like a parade that celebrates an event. 

He reflects on how anyone feels when the fun of the parade has passed by and is only a memory.  He is longing to be close to nature again.

"He sees colour, texture, and movement with the eyes of a painter. His mood is romantic and nostalgic; his quiet, casual tone is made fresh by his spontaneous joy in ordinary things and in the processes of rural life and nature."

"Moses writes about the places and people he knows, on and around the farm where he grew up and the city where he works."

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