Does Brutus fit this description, or is the tragic hero someone else—perhaps Caesar? Do you think, instead, that the play lacks a tragic hero?In Aristotle’s essay the Poetics, he describes the...

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Julius Caesar

Does Brutus fit this description, or is the tragic hero someone else—perhaps Caesar? Do you think, instead, that the play lacks a tragic hero?

In Aristotle’s essay the Poetics, he describes the tragic hero as a person more noble than evil, whose fortunes go from good to bad, someone with a character flaw that leads to his downfall.

"Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare

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Julius Caesar, Caesar is not the central character in its action; he appears in only three scenes, and is killed at the beginning of the third act. The protagonist of the play is Marcus Brutus, and the central psychological drama is his struggle between the conflicting demands of honour, patriotism, and friendship. Julius Caesar, Caesar is not the central character in its action; he appears in only three scenes, and is killed at the beginning of the third act. The protagonist of the play is Marcus Brutus, and the central psychological drama is his struggle between the conflicting demands of honour, patriotism, and friendship. The growing tide of public support soon turns Brutus against Caesar.A soothsayer warns Caesar to "beware the Ides of March. As Caesar, predictably, rejects the petition, Casca grazes Caesar in the back of his neck, and the others follow in stabbing him; Brutus is last. At this point, Caesar utters the famous line "Et tu, Brute?"[ At the battle, Cassius and Brutus knowing they will probably both die, smile their last smiles to each other and hold hands. During the battle, Cassius commits suicide after hearing of the capture of his best friend, Titinius. After Titinius, who wasn't really captured, sees Cassius's corpse, he commits suicide. However, Brutus wins the battle. Brutus, with a heavy heart, battles again the next day. He loses and commits suicide. The play ends with a tribute to Brutus by Antony, who proclaims that Brutus has remained "the noblest Roman of them all", because he was the only conspirator who acted for the good of Rome. Stoicism is Brutus’s philosophy. It makes him calmly deal with the matter.Shakespeare miogogjt

 

 

 

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