Do you think that science (without faith) is sufficent to explain every phenomenon?faith and religion



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speamerfam's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

Absolutely yes! Now, that does not mean that science can presently explain every phenomenon, simply that we are capable of doing so, given enough time and information, without throwing faith into the mix.  This is really a false dichotomy to me, religions vs. science, as it has been for many who are/were scientists and people of faith.  Einstein and Frances Collins (head of the Genome Project) come to mind, both powerful intellects, solving the mysteries of the universe, with their faith firmly intact.  Religion, for me, is not about explanation, but about having a connection to a higher power and a system of values and behavior.  Science is about theories and explanations of natural phenomena. 

williambred's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #3)

I think that those intellects who use only science to explain natural phenomena, rejecting any kind of faith, end either by becoming mad or committing suicide simply because they lack spiritual power in their mind which necessary to live in balance.


najm1947's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #4)

Scientific theories change with time but try to explain various phenomena based on the existing knowledge gathered through observation and experiment however inherently lacks completeness due to its susceptibility to change and at best provides us with the half-truth. So it is impossible to explain all phenomena on the basis of science.

On the other hand faith provides clues to some absolute realities, to the people who believe, but is basically meant to provide a connection between the man and Creator. The purpose of faith is not to explain the natural phenomenon.

For the people who believe, any scientific explanation contradicting the realities provided by faith are flawed and need further research to make the two consistent.

pohnpei397's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #5)

I agree with Post #2 if we are talking about physical phenomena.  However, that is not all there is in the world.  For example, can we really define through science what separates humans from the lower animals?  Can we define love through science?  These are things that cannot be completely explained through science.

litteacher8's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #6)

I don't think that anyone can explain EVERY phenomenon. I do agree that there has to be an explanation for everything, but "scientific" is kind of a loose term. The truth is that we can explain many things that people could only attribute to magic or God a thousand years ago, or even a few hundred years ago. We may have enough technology to explain quite a lot today, but we don't yet have the technology to explain everything.
iklan100's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #7)

speamerfam is right in that science is also an 'evolutionary' system and much that we didnt or dont understand , we now do. and the key word is 'yet'-- we dont know much yet but as we keep on expanding our knowledge base we keep on learning and developing new technologies too. All this, in my view is possible because of what i consider the Prime force/Prime Mover, for as the universe evolves and grows so do we, by the will and collusion of the whole universal web.

shake99's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #8)

Science will never explain every phenomenon. There is always a deeper question to be asked. For this reason, science has an inexhaustible supply of things to study.

However, I'm not sure that faith can explain any phenomenon. It is not the function of faith to explain. It is faith's job to believe without definitive proof. This kind of belief creates a power and value of its own. It doesn't have to explain anything.

homin007's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #9)

mwalter822, makes sense-- faith is not an explanation, it is simply belief!

luiji's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #10)

Scientists will make up baloney to answer any question. Whether it's the truth or not, we will never know.

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