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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?The question is asked...

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trchambers | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 2, 2009 at 11:03 AM via web

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

171 Answers | Add Yours

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laurenkate2488 | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 8, 2009 at 6:58 PM (Answer #31)

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The answer is.... ENGAGE STUDENTS. Some students are just stubborn and completely unwilling to learn. There is ultimately nothing you can do about that since it's their free will and their teenage angst that's making them 'too bored' to pay attention.  Otherwise, by having atleast one interactive activity for each lesson will help keep students engaged. Also associating topics to more relatable things for students can help them connect the information to their personal lives, and it will be instilled in their minds better.

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mrtaylor | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 2, 2009 at 2:42 PM (Answer #5)

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I myself am an english high school teacher and I know how students tend to get bored very easily. My solution is to read stories I know have a life message as well as thrill and suspense. I am frequently looking for new ways to involve fun lessons and activities. When studying Shakespeare, I like the students to have a hands on experience, mainly by acting the scenes out and performing plays in class. My students love hands on learning, I've found and therefore my lesson plans are in my view, interesting while learning.

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curlyq92 | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 4, 2009 at 6:45 AM (Answer #19)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

Being that I am a student, I get bored because I feel that I already know enough about the lesson or I want to think about something else. I'm not trying to be rude, I just want to think or do something that is more interesting. However, I also understand that everything taught in class can't work around what I want to do, but if the  teacher can get at least one student interested that feeling seems to flow through the majority of the students.

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onebigkiwi | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 11, 2009 at 4:46 PM (Answer #33)

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To engage my fourth graders, I simply start an art project! The weekend before a new reading/math/social studies, etc., lesson, I look at what we can make that is cheap; it identifies the main concepts; and that each section we add daily relates to our topic/s. Students love it. A short introduction to the topic/concept, and we are away with the the project. By the end of the week my students can tell or write everything I needed them to know through the art project and they get to take it home and explain it all over again to their parents. Parents I never hear from call me or come by and help in class they are so excited. They tell me their child has never been so engaged in school and they can't wait until the weekend is over to see what they are going to make next! An example of something we did recently was to make a raft. It went along with our weekly reading of a story called The Raft. We made it using mostly popsicle sticks and on each stick we wrote down one part of the story to create a fantastic summary. At the end of the week, each student, even my lowest reader, could retell the story's setting, characters, and major events, with great detail. It really brought the comprehension side of the lesson to life. This type of small project can lessen the lecture side, but still get all the PASS skills in that are needed for their end-of-year exams. Discussing the concepts while making an art project also helped my needy learners answer the worksheets involved.

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chapy7 | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 11, 2009 at 6:24 PM (Answer #35)

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The only time I'm ever genuinely bored is when a teacher gives long lectures with literally no change in his or her articulation. I think it's because I'm an audio learner that how teachers sound affects me so much. I also think that a teacher has to have some way of connecting to the students. Without a way to be on the same page as us, the students, I feel almost stranded--like I want to agree with what's being said, but I can't trust that the teacher will know where I'm coming from. You know what I mean?

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fernholz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 11, 2009 at 6:28 PM (Answer #34)

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Students who are engaged in learning-not bored-are those who feel like they have a choice and are held responsible for their learning. First obtain feedback from students. I give a Reading Interest Inventory at the beginning of the year. When I find out a student does not like to read I figure out their interests.

Sometimes students don't like to read because they find it difficult. It's the teachers job to find the ability level of each student and gear lessons to meet their needs. Students will feel successful and connect to lessons when they are taught at their level. Those students who seem bored probably lack the ability to keep up with other students in the regular classroom.

Another tool I use to engage students is the Smartboard. Some schools may not have the funding to supply Smartboards, but if you have one use it! There are so many great, interactive activities that students really enjoy. When I teach vocabulary to my students we use the Frayer model. Students each get a word to present to the class. They are given time to find information about the word. Finally they write their word on the Smartboard while their peers write the word on their own sheets. This is a great team building activity!

Overall I have noticed my students becoming more engaged in the lessons when I offer choices, do interactive activities, and hold them responsible for their learning. We also use the SIOP model and explain why we are learning this. It helps them connect to the lesson!

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kimfuji | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted October 13, 2009 at 12:10 AM (Answer #36)

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Students must take ownership of thier own education!  Why do they get bored?  Maybe the way the material is being presented is boring.  In my experience, High school students will do what you set them up to do.  If you engage a kid with a cool demonstration, he is much more likely to listen to the principles behind that demo. Teachers need to not be afraid of teaching the same concepts in different ways.  One quick example.  I was reviewing the states of matter with my 10th grade biology students.  Very simple matter for most of them, could be done in a "boring" way by listing each state and writing examples. We chose to make ooblick (2 parts corn starch, 1 part water) and try to identify it as a solid or liquid.  For those of you who have never messed with a non-newtonian fluid, it is liquid unless you apply pressure to it and it becomes more solid.  Youtube has some interesting clips with people running on these liquids.  Much more interesting than a list of solid, liquid, gas... .zzzz. zzzzz....

I agree that students need to take ownership of their own learning. I am a proponent of Paulo Friere's concept of learning, along with the feminist learning theory of Bell Hooks.

I think teachers need to be interesting, yes. I am a teacher and I have taught since 1982, so I know that's true. But we need not become entertainers. I mean: there may be "some" boring aspects that still need to be taught.

As a parent I enforce my son doing his homework. And I stress learning everyday in our regular environment. But mostly I do it because I enjoy learning; and I want him to enjoy learning also. He does I think because he sees that my husband and I read a lot and enjoy learning.

I think there is a larger problem in our culture that discourages learning and that is seeking instant gratification. I also think that desiring money above all things is also a false value that is encouraged in our culture today. I think back to when I was my son's age. It was during the Vietnam War. We tried to change society. We believed we could change society for the better. I think that is a noble ideal even though it didn't work so well. Nowadays most of the students only aspire to get rich or become famous. I think with those ideals it is hard to justify studying hard and learning.

I don't know. But I think it is a combination of teachers trying to be stimulating and students being ultimatley responsible for their own learning.

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marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted October 15, 2009 at 10:30 PM (Answer #41)

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When students are bored, teachers have GOT TO look in the mirror and say, "What am I doing to plan lessons that bore my students?" This is extremely difficult for most teachers to do. I didn't learn to do it until I went through National Board Certification and had to videotape my classroom.

There are many strategies that middle and high school teachers can use to make lessons interesting and participatory, using technology or not. However, most of them, especially high school teachers, fall back into the mode of teacher talking then students doing seatwork. This is intensely boring to students.

  I tend to agree with you.  If my students are bored, I take full responsibility and start looking at my teaching methods and materials.  Perhaps I can spice things up a bit or engage them in something more interactive.  Weather permitting, we sometimes move our lesson outside on the lawn or up in the library.  It's the same lesson, but in a different surroundings and they love it!

If it's hi-tech that stimulates them, intersperse your lesson materials with timely DVD's or slide shows.  Every student these days responds to these types of media.  And, a lecture becomes more interesting if there are pictures to go along with it.

Another solution I've discovered is when students are bored and you seem to be losing them, try doing something physical and get them moving.  An activity lasting only five minutes can refresh and stimulate and get them back on track. 

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protecter | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 16, 2009 at 7:53 PM (Answer #42)

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Engaging lessons are a must. I teach at the primary level and while I try to incorporate lessons that get them up and moving around, most of the time I make sure that they are constructing things with their hands and engaging in accountable talk with a partner to discuss what they are learning.  

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vpanos | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 17, 2009 at 5:21 PM (Answer #43)

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Many things within their own lives distract most students; it is a struggle to keep their attention on math. I have girls that worry only about the large earrings that hang from their ears. They worry about how good they look and what the boys think of them. They worry if mom is going to finally come home tonight or if dad is going to come home drunk and beat on her and her mom. Some are raising little brothers and sisters because mom is out doing crack cocaine or sleeping with the neighborhood for cash and food while dad is in prison. The boys are coming into their sexuality and I have to compete with the girls...can you imagine which one would win, math or the girl in the front row with the skimpy shorts and large breasts? I have witnessed 13 year olds walk around school with long Island Ice teas in their Gatorade bottles. I have seen all of this and much more, but I refuse to give up. I will make a difference. I will not reach one child out of 35...I will reach all 35. I will give up my time freely, and will always smile in the face of exhaustion. Everyone one of them is worth effort, and success is the only option. Failure is just an excuse to be lazy, or dodge responsibility. If things get tough then work harder. Children are our future. I let my students know I care; I don't let up on them. I teach them real world math, attitude, and what it takes to succeed. When my students leave me, they leave prepared for not only HS but as a life long problem solver.

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sfg13165 | Student, College Freshman | (Level 2) Honors

Posted October 19, 2009 at 2:52 PM (Answer #46)

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most kids get bored because the teacher is not engaging them to even listen.Teachers aren't putting in enough effort to even try to get the kids to ask question or listen. most of the time its not just the teachers fault its the students fault as well (two wrongs don't make a right). The student gets bored because they might not know how to do the work or they don't care to do it..... think about that

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schoolbaby14 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 19, 2009 at 3:50 PM (Answer #47)

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Children today are growing up in an entertainment based world.  Their entire lives are digital: from their cell phones, to T.V., to video games, and MP3/iPods. 

When students step into a classroom (unless the school has a high budget) they are not seeing all these technological devices while learning.  Too many teachers are still teaching by lecturing, but students now need more.

In order to keep students engaged, they need to be interested.  Technology interests students.  Giving them the ability to demonstrate understanding of a concept through a PowerPoint presentation is more appealing to them then a paper-pencil test.  Their creativity is brought out and they are more inclined to try their best and be more attentive.  When students see papers in color under an ELMO rather than an overhead, they are more engaged.  The color speaks to them and they have an easier time focusing.

Until allteachers incorporate technology daily into their lessons, students will continue to be bored at school.  Now, is this the teachers' fault? No. Is this the students' fault? No. No one can be to blame that our great nation has developed technology in such a way that it interests young minds.  Older minds just need to do their best to adapt and become learners once again.

That is not entirerly true. Kids get bored because it is not interesting.they would have a better time focusing if the class could be a little more fun.

 

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writerman | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 19, 2009 at 7:11 PM (Answer #48)

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In our current education system assessment and accountability often drive local curriculum.  Teachers and schools are preoccupied, and rightly so, with federal and state expectations.  These excpectations are often communicated to school districts by state standards, grade level expectations, current state assessments, etc.  "Teaching to the test" has become a common buzz phrase that disgruntled teachers mumble under their breath while students sit in desks completing a monotony of state assessments.

In Missouri (where I teach) the list of expectations I have as a middle school teacher for one semester is overwhelming.  There is so much to cover in such little time that it is easy to loose focus from teaching for understanding and engagement and instead teaching for content coverage.

The engaging, logical fruit of our curriculum is squashed with often abstract, nebulous information that students don't understand or feel connected to.  We manage to squelch the natural curiosity of youth instead of tapping into it by providing thought provoking inquiry and experiences.  We take the life out of learning.  We have made it our priority to produce data success instead of real-life success--engaged, life-long learners.

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dragonpalidin23 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 21, 2009 at 11:56 AM (Answer #49)

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For me personally, a high school student, learning is fun when the teachers are fun and I dont mean that they give us activities all the time or free time.

My english teacher talks nonstop but also acts out things by herself, or changes her voice, it is very amusing and keeps everyone engaged.

Teachers who arent afraid to make fools of themselves are usually the most liked at my school.

My algebra 2 teacher is an old, white, large, woman but everyone loves her. She is always trying to "act black" or she makes-fun (playfully) of students. She also plays these random math formula songs from youtube, and it's the funniest thing.

My chem. teacher may not be the best person in the world but she is wonderful at explaining things. She even let us take pictures with our cells during a flame lab where we saw different chemicals turn different colors. That alone made us giddy all day....

Teachers who learn to bend the rules are the best.

For example if we're assigned silent reading it's obvious we are going to talk but not so much when a teacher says "Silent reading, but you can use your ipods...no sharing and if i can hear it you cant use it" (and of course even if it is too loud she just gives a warning)

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dragonpalidin23 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 21, 2009 at 11:56 AM (Answer #50)

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-CONTINUATION-

However there are some teachers who are absolutley horrible at getting us engaged.

My chinese teacher is so bent on getting everyone to like her, no one does. She doesnt explain things well, she gets annoyed at commonly asked questions, she thinks projects are fun, she doesnt like it when even a single person talks...(she once waited for my class to realize that we had to be quiet on our own for 20 minutes on a test day. All she had to do was say "okay guys, its time for a test, no talking" and started passing out the papers. Thats ALL, but instead she cut into our test time and we ended up having to stay during lunch to finish.

 

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dragonpalidin23 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 21, 2009 at 11:56 AM (Answer #51)

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-CONTINUATION-

Also a big thing for me is that i get too much HW, i dont think teachers realize they are overloading me and thats why im always stressed out, tired, and not focusing in class.

Teachers should communicate with other teachers in different subjects so they know whats going on. I do HW from 2:10pm-2am everyday and it leaves me exhausted. I do understand that HW is essential in all classes especially in Hist., Govt., and Math but sometimes its just too much. A page there, two essay here, a speech, a project. They all add up and sometimes it literally is imposible to finish.

It is now the end of the first quarter and teachers are piling the work. The lack of sleep leaves us grumpy and uninterested in school. So the only way to get us back is to allow us to socialize (cutting HW seems impossible) When i socialize in class even in a group discussion (because we all know students go off topic) I regain some energy and focus or even 5 minutes to ourselves at the end of class.

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dragonpalidin23 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 21, 2009 at 12:00 PM (Answer #52)

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I understand that being a teacher is hard, and sometimes you might want to just run out screaming but sometimes you just have to fake a smile, laugh, or just take 5 for a breather.

I do sympathize teachers, they have one of the hardest jobs.

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rolltide12 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 23, 2009 at 7:45 PM (Answer #53)

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Teachers need to realize they are not entertainers.  They cannot compete with the Xbox or a blockbuster movie.

Sometimes you have to lecture.  If you can help the student see how the material applies to their life it helps.  (Even if you have to show them how learning this concept is a means to an end...ie a diploma.)

Teachers often beat their heads against the wall and try changing their style and lessons to get the kids motivated.  in reality motivation should come from within.  The parents should be instilling a love for learning to the child LONG before they come to school.  Sadly, teachers have to assume this role in some cases.

As long as the teacher truly loves his or her job the student will see their passion and that is usually enough to earn their respect and attention.

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kellyl | Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 23, 2009 at 10:06 PM (Answer #54)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

I have to agree that technology is the major reason students are bored.  I teach high school in an urban school district where technology is limited.  As a result, my overhead projector just doesn't do it for them.  It would be great to have a SMARTBOARD.  Other than developing creative methods to teach and provide for stimulating lessons, I've tried to make the classroom environment bright and colorful with print rich materials related to my content area.  I always tell them I you are bored and do not want to listen to me, read the tips for Being and Active Reader, look at the definitions for Testing Vocabulary Words or Lit Terms.

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harleyrose | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 24, 2009 at 6:00 PM (Answer #56)

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Children today are growing up in an entertainment based world.  Their entire lives are digital: from their cell phones, to T.V., to video games, and MP3/iPods. 

When students step into a classroom (unless the school has a high budget) they are not seeing all these technological devices while learning.  Too many teachers are still teaching by lecturing, but students now need more.

In order to keep students engaged, they need to be interested.  Technology interests students.  Giving them the ability to demonstrate understanding of a concept through a PowerPoint presentation is more appealing to them then a paper-pencil test.  Their creativity is brought out and they are more inclined to try their best and be more attentive.  When students see papers in color under an ELMO rather than an overhead, they are more engaged.  The color speaks to them and they have an easier time focusing.

Until allteachers incorporate technology daily into their lessons, students will continue to be bored at school.  Now, is this the teachers' fault? No. Is this the students' fault? No. No one can be to blame that our great nation has developed technology in such a way that it interests young minds.  Older minds just need to do their best to adapt and become learners once again.

As a student, I don't really agree. Having to copy down a powerpoint slideshow for notes is just as boring as coping an overhead. I do not really understand why my teachers are so excited about smart boards and other stuff like that when I would just rather listen to an interesting teacher lecture about something important to me. My favorite teachers are the ones who make whatever they are teaching interesting and imortant to me; they laugh, joke, relate what they are teaching to everyday life, and most importantly, include the students in the lectures. It is not technology's fault of why students are becoming bored in teachers' classes but it is the teachers themselves and their own personalities.  Older adults, I think need to stop blaming the youth's problems on technology and maybe more on the adults of this era or maybe just a shift in moral values over a generation or two.

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gurugurian | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 26, 2009 at 9:20 PM (Answer #57)

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Look at the world today's students are in and compare it to that when we were school children.  The internet has made the world smaller providing information overload.  Students today never knew a world without computers, cell phones, high tech video games systems like wii or video conferencing. They are shuttled between homes of divorced parents and have been forced to grow up faster then anyone before them.  In my classroom subscribe to the methodology of edutainment.  If I can keep them entertained then they will forget about all the issues and learn.  They feel safe as I listen to them.  I am a big supporter of DWOK (Different Ways of Knowing).  Not all children are going to learn the same way.  You need to be creative and stimulate the auditory, visual, sensory, and physical learners.  If you make your lessons personal to them they are not bored.  Give them ownership of their education and I know you will see a difference, especially when they feel you believe in them.  When a teacher tells me that their students are bored I ask them have you ever asked them what you can do to better serve them.  You would be surprised that they are very willing to tell you why some teachers are very successful with them, while others they simply turn off.  Ultimately to me it comes down to the fact they in the outside world are over stimulated and then in class under!

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tduffy | Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted October 27, 2009 at 11:20 AM (Answer #58)

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I agree that teachers need to engage students, and maybe update their lesson plans for each group of students- but what bothers me is that all this sounds like "lets keep them amused just like TV, and computer games, and all the other technological devices do.." but what happens when these kids get to college, and some of their lectures are 11/2- 3 hours long, and the professor "lectures" and expects students to listen and take notes?  With all this focus on "entertaining" lesson plans in High School and the lower grades, are we really doing our kids a service and preparing them for the "real" world, which I am sorry to say, is about "doing what you professor, or boss wants, even if you don't want to." I think we are raising a generation of spoiled and self-indulgent kids who may not make it past the first year in college, the shock and work-load will just be too much. And we must take the blame for this-

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mcalnan | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 27, 2009 at 8:17 PM (Answer #59)

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Having been a high school teacher, graduate professor, doctoral/masters/bacherlor's student, all the classes where I have paid attention have 1 common element- a passionate instructor. A passionate instructor typically comes with a depth of knowledge, confidence, enthusiasm, and the ability to communicate. No need for a mandatory attendance policy, no draconian policies, no technology, and no games or self-esteem building exercises. It didn't matter if it was a 100+ lecture hall or a 15 person seminar course, if the instructor loved the subject, it was always contagious! My experience as a professor is the same- when my teaching assignments are aligned with my passions for the subjects I am the most motivated enthusiastic instructor. I see the immediate reflection of my attitude in the faces of my students. If students aren't paying attention, ask yourself how you can make it more interesting for you to teach? What excites you? Then find a way to incorporate that into your lessons. The kids will see how excited you are and it will eventually catch on. You'll both be happier!

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profdujour | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 28, 2009 at 6:32 PM (Answer #60)

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One aspect of teaching that I struggled with, is the need to see productivity a certain way.  Is learning silent and orderly.  Students aren't always bored because they say, "I'm bored."  Rather, we have to look at as an attention getter, the subtext of which might more accurately be, "I have no business here,"  "I'm not included", "I don't feel challenged," or "I don't want to engage with this particular question."  It is so much easier to say I'm bored.  I believe a push in a more specific direction is needed when a student expresses himself this way.

 

 

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speechteach | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 29, 2009 at 6:58 PM (Answer #61)

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Great question!  It is the responsibility of both students and teachers to make class interesting, relevant, and engaging.  Students must come into class with an open mind, a zeal for learning, and a willing attitude. Teachers should be totally prepared for the lesson, excited about what they are teaching, and ready to give a new twist to an old concept.  I know that when my students have choices, they are more apt to do a good job for me.  For example, we just finished a section of American short stories, and they were to do projects.  I gave guidelines, but they "did their own thing."  I had skits, power points, slide shows, posters, papers, etc.  Out of 60 11th graders, all but 2 did the project and enjoyed it. Teachers must be willing to change with the times.  I cannot teach Poe, Whitman or anything else the same way today as I did when I began teaching 35 years ago. While I don't feel as though I have to perform a Broadway show to keep students interested, I do feel that I need to utilize new methods and technology to keep abreast of what interests today's students.  Some students do want a fast fix, a short cut to learning; however, various "old school" methods  like buckling down and studying are still effective.  Cooperation from students and teachers is imperative in order for learning to take place in today's classrooms. Both must come to the table with the right tools and attitude if there is to be success.

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ljs317 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 30, 2009 at 3:29 PM (Answer #62)

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I totally agree with everything 61 shared.  I'm not sure that the students are bored - their outside activities are so much more stimulating - ie, computer, cell phones, texting, facebook - it is such a colorful visual world - students have become more visual learners, not the auditory learners they used to be.  My own first grade students have visited Disney World so many times and have told me they are bored from going to Disney World.  How do teachers compete with that!!  Teaching is becoming more challenging by the minute.  In some ways, I do feel like we have to do a Broadway show, in order to capture their attention, and have them experience something stimulating in the classroom.  Their expectations are high, based on their experiences outside the classroom.

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jseligmann | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted November 1, 2009 at 10:56 PM (Answer #63)

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When I was twelve and thirteen, I was really into science, especially rockets and space. It was the early days of the US space program, and I was so absorbed by the whole subject that I even made my own crude, pen-top, match-head rockets in my basement. This was so long ago, folks, that there was no NASA yet!

Then came October 4, 1957. That was the day that one of the greatest events in the world of science, space, rockets and technology shocked the world: Russia had launched the first man-made earth satellite, the basketball-sized, shiny, silvery Sputnik. I was soooo excited.

October 4 fell on a Friday that year, and I absolutely couldn't wait for school to start on Monday when we could talk about this monumental event in science class. Well, Monday came, and there I finally was in 4th period science. I sat at my desk near the back of the room all excited and full of anticipation. The grey-haired science teacher stood up at his desk, paused for a second and said, "OK class: open your chemistry books to page 419."

Of course, my heart simply sank in my chest. This was not a student participation class; this was a serious science lecture, day after day, and you did what the teacher told you to. I was crushed with disappointment and did what I was told to do.

But I did learn a serious, life-changing lesson that day. When I became a teacher, many years later, I determined not to ever make the same myopic mistake that my eighth-grade science teacher had made so many years before. Every class, for the last thirty seven years, I begin with the same sentence. I ask this loud and clear: "Does anyone have anything to say?" Be assured that this is no idle question. All of my students learn from the very first day of class, and know for certain, that I am sincerely interested to hear and discuss what each and every one of them may have on their minds. They know that comes first.

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teach205 | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 2, 2009 at 3:36 PM (Answer #64)

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Absolutely, teachers in many areas are "handcuffed" by directives from their districts to TEACH TESTS !!!  This cripples the talented teachers ability to share valuable, interesting, hands on experiences that were passed on to them by their talented instructors.  Teaching facts, without conceptuall;y delivering the relevance of the facts get very boring to students, and take teachers out of their "elememt"/

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studentsview | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 3, 2009 at 3:30 PM (Answer #65)

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Coming from a STUDENTS point of view,

We want teachers to come down to our level in teaching. Most of the teachers i've met in the past has picked favourites and pets, we all want to be treated the same. Some teachers need to be harsher, some teachers need to place boundaries on their achievement levels they want us to achieve. We are only kids but that's just coming from a STUDENTS POINT OF VIEW!

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madmike131 | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 7, 2009 at 3:39 PM (Answer #66)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

its because kids like to do more hands on activitys and not sit at a desk for hours just writing all day.

also because most kids hate school

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alan1948 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 15, 2009 at 4:14 PM (Answer #67)

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I've always thought of my classroom as my stage and my students as my audience.  You must capture the audiences attention before you can communicate with them.  You must also have a very good knowledge of the subject matter.  If you don't have their attention it doesn't matter how much knowledge you possess, they mind is on something else.

You must also be enthusiastic about whatever lesson you are working on.  Motivation is very important. You must catch their interest and once you get it you cannot lose it.

This might sound very simplistic to some but  in my opinion, it is the most essential part of being an effective teacher.You may possess a great amount of knowledge of your subject matter but transferring that information to your students is what teaching is all about.

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princess-of-eberthang-09 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted November 16, 2009 at 5:42 AM (Answer #68)

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ok ill answer this question because im a student. the reason why we get really bored during class is because the class is boring... OBVIOUSLY!!!! teachers that have more "group projects" or "trivia games" have the best classes... when i was in 8th grade last year... my georgia history teacher had history trivia games where she had a "easy button"... she divided the class into two groups and she would select one student from each group to answer a question and whoever hit the easy button first got to answer the question... and if u got it right u got a certain amount of points but if u got it wrong the points it was worth got taken off your teams point list... the winning teams reword was 10 extra credit points on the end of the chapter test... thats just an idea... we loved it... and it helped us memorize... but if your not a history teacher this could also work in other classes... you know what i mean... just use share point and put the question.... i hope this helps you out ... :)) but if your a college teacher.. umm... im not sure that would be to cool.... its kinda.. middle/high schoolish.

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 19, 2009 at 8:47 PM (Answer #69)

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Don't you think a good teacher makes all the difference. In my experience, I liked something or hated something based on my teacher. Kids usually do not have enough discernment to know what they like or dislike and even if they do, it is still developing. Also, isn't all material interesting from a certain perspective? I think teachers make a huge difference.

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 19, 2009 at 8:48 PM (Answer #70)

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Don't you think a good teacher makes all the difference? In my experience, I liked something or hated something based on my teacher. Kids usually do not have enough discernment to know what they like or dislike and even if they do, it is still developing. Also, isn't all material interesting from a certain perspective? I think teachers make a huge difference.

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schrick | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 25, 2009 at 8:48 AM (Answer #73)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

Students are bored because teachers do not consider their audience.  We tell the students to write and consider who is going to be reading but we teach and do not consider who we are teaching too.  We have to make sure that we practice what we preach.  Evaluate your work, look for errors, adjust to what the audience wants and expects from you.  Engage your students.  That does not mean being up and folding, cutting, and pasting.  That means do something that they relate to.  Show them how what they are learning applies to real life situations.  Consider where they come from and what their exposure level is.  Do not assume anything!  Bottom line....meet them where they are at and take them farther!

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shannadowd | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 25, 2009 at 5:25 PM (Answer #74)

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As a teacher, my philosophy is that students need to explore and discover so they can formulate their own answers.  Teachers are supposed to guide their students to find the answer for themselves - this way not only do they learn what the correct answer is (if there is only one correct answer) but they learn the actual process which makes the learning more concrete.  Simply telling students what they need to know and then expecting them to readily recall the answers or information (that is not learning that's just recalling facts). Instead, we need to help them become problem-solvers so that they are better equipped to enter the real world.  Many of my students have the necessary skills but they have no clue as to how to apply those skills. 

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byersk | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 26, 2009 at 2:49 PM (Answer #75)

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I believe that students are bored in their classes for several reasons.  I think that often students are not be challenged to think for themselves.  They are expected to repeat back what the teacher has spewed to them.  I, also, think that teachers often present information in ways that is not motivating to students or that brings meaning of the subject matter to them.  Furthermore, I feel that many teachers are so busy dealing with inappropriate behaviors that the students that are there to learn get lost and become bored with the class and peers' behaviors.  Finally, students have been pushed to be involved in so many outside activities and to grow up so fast, that the purpose of education has been lost to them.

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sdoldo | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 26, 2009 at 5:16 PM (Answer #76)

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I teach in a rural middle school.  I don't have a problem with boredom with my fifth grade students, but I often hear my eighth grade students complain about how boring some of their classes are.  Being the parent of a high school student I also feel like I have a little insight into why students feel like their classes are boring.

I recently taught a lesson during my reading class that called for the students to look up their vocabulary words in a dictionary, write the definition, and use each vocabulary word in a sentence.  BORING!  Instead, I found the vocabulary words in the lyrics of four songs, downloaded the songs to my iPod, and let my students listen to each song.  I then broke the students up into four groups and their task was to interpret the songs, to include the vocab. 

I think students are really bored because they don't feel a connection with the lesson topic.  Honestly, who wants to copy notes from an overhead projector and listen to someone read the notes to them?  BORING!  When a student can relate to the lesson they will become much more engaged.  I realize that not every topic can be exciting, but as a teacher, there are many ways to create interesting lesson plans that will engage students.

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char1944ny | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 30, 2009 at 9:44 AM (Answer #77)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

One reason students are bored in the classroom : they do not see the relevance of what they are learning. It is part of our job as teachers to show them how the lesson applies to them.

A second reason for boredom : the students are passive learners. It is our job as teachers to get them to actively participate in the lesson. This could be a hands on activity, a discussion, group work, etc.

A third reason for boredom : they already know the stuff we are teaching. At the beginning of the unit take the time to find out what they know about the subject and what they want to know. Then we can adjust our lesson plans to take this into consideration.

A final reason : if we can't show enthusiasm for what we are teaching how can we expect them to be anything but bored.

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parsons4 | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 1, 2009 at 10:03 AM (Answer #78)

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I have found that students will enjoy class time if the entire class is engaged in an activity.  The formula for a successful activity should include a gently competitive stimulus, liberal guidelines, to allow for spontaneity, and student input.   Learning is more fun if the students have a voice when it comes to lesson planning.  They know what interests them, and we should listen.  A good example of this type of activity is to have the class write a story together.  Each student writes one sentence on an overhead projector, or ELMO, so that the other students can see the story evolving.  Students will automatically correct each other for spelling and punctuation, creating the atmosphere of competition.  This activity can be adjusted to include a grammar lesson for the day.  For example, every sentence in the story must begin with an introductory phrase.  By the end of class, every student in the room can use and punctuate introductory phrases!

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jnaylon | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 1, 2009 at 3:44 PM (Answer #79)

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I think there are many reasons that students appear bored in class. They are from the tech age. Everything is bright and fast paced. Lots of excitement everywhere. I feel that teachers have become entertainers. I find that I need to be really animated and theatrical to really get full participation. I think part of it is simply the age of middle school students as well. They are dealing with a lot of emotions, things have changed a lot since we were young. These students are facing so much more than we ever did at that young age and without the experience base to rely upon. 

Also, I think that technology has impacted the communication skills of our youth. They aren't engaged in as much conversation since they text and email. They arent' as practiced in writing since they spend so much time typing. I think writing also improves attention, understanding, and communication.

Lastly, I think teachers are forced to teach to tests and their creative sparks have sufferred. I feel that as teachers we are unable to meet the various learning styles of our students because we must focus on the spring exams. I think this added stress impacts our students as we race to cover material and leave students without content mastery in the dust. Why would they be interested in the lesson?

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engtchr5 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted December 3, 2009 at 4:30 PM (Answer #80)

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Many good things have already been asserted on this topic, some of which I firmly agree with, and some that I'd like to modify slightly.

For one thing, high-tech gadgets and blinking internet wizardry are not completely necessary to maintain an engaging, non-boring classroom. I am fortunate -- I teach at a school where we have SmartBoards in every classroom, various computer labs for intensive reading help, among other things, and a lot of technology that other schools don't yet have access to.

That said, some of the best lessons I have had in my class have occurred when the SmartBoard is turned off, and when no one has their laptop, cell phone, or other "gadget du jour" available. It is in those moments when we as a group truly get to connect with one another -- no false pretenses, no Facebook personas, just kids being kids, and their teacher being himself. When all the technology goes away, students are left with nothing but themselves, and while that may be uncomfortable at first, after brief adjustments, students very much respond to it.

Technology does not equate to Engagement. The two complement one another, perhaps, but we as educational professionals must not make the mistake of placing all our faith in shiny classroom toys, some of which are more hype than help. It is our choice to have engaging classrooms, and our responsibility as well. A bored student is our cue to step it up and be the best we can possibly be.

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jcsmith | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 5, 2009 at 11:44 AM (Answer #81)

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Students often say they are bored for a variety of reasons.

1) They are so used to quickly changing events.

2) They are unable or unwilling to focus on one thing for any length of time.

3) The classroom doesn't offer the entertainment that they are accustomed to.

4) Sometimes, students will say they are bored when in reality, they can't read well and sometimes, they can't read at all.

 

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selena-hoe | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 5, 2009 at 7:44 PM (Answer #82)

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Mostly because we want to do something besides sit in a classroom watching the teacher walk back and forth across the white/black board explaining things and reading the textbook, if my teachers would do more handson things like more of my teachers did last year i would be alot less board and probably learn even more!

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vikinglady | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 6, 2009 at 10:45 AM (Answer #83)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

I definitely agree that kids today have so much to isolate themselves from the outside world with ipods, cell phones, video games, computer, etc. The culture of this group has become one in which language and vocabulary have changed. Some of my students who get bored are really struggling with language and have low reading levels.

I agree that kids get bored not only with subject matter ( I hated math, and did horrible), but with teaching styles, and assignments. With high school kids, you have to change activities every 20 minutes or so, or you'll lose them.

Depending on where (socio-economic) you teach, you run into the value of education as well. Many of my students come from a background where education is not looked at as something valuable for the future, but a place where kids go before they become of age to work. If parents do not support students, students are not going to care about anything you teach them. That's where you find boredom, and discipline problems.

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kymber7 | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 6, 2009 at 2:55 PM (Answer #84)

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Many people attribute the ennuit of students to their teachers and the material presented. I agree that the way in which content is approached makes a big difference. Teachers do need to try their best to stay current and somewhat entertaining if they expect to truly penetrate the ever-redirecting attentions of their students. However, students need to be held accountable for focusing thier own attention on the task at hand. Too often, we are assuming it's the teacher's fault. I took my students on a field trip to a play the other day. The play was about math concepts and how ancient mathematicians come to tutor a girl their age in the subject. They discuss how certain theories developed influenced modern-day things like the probability of poker hands, etc. The students who paid attention to the performance found it interesting, while those who let their minds wander and then expected to know what was happening when they clued back in, said it was terrible. It may not be the best example, but it goes to show that they have to try on their end for us to be successful on ours.

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kathie | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 6, 2009 at 4:15 PM (Answer #85)

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I myself am an english high school teacher and I know how students tend to get bored very easily. My solution is to read stories I know have a life message as well as thrill and suspense. I am frequently looking for new ways to involve fun lessons and activities. When studying Shakespeare, I like the students to have a hands on experience, mainly by acting the scenes out and performing plays in class. My students love hands on learning, I've found and therefore my lesson plans are in my view, interesting while learning.

Yes! As an older college student (English major), I have enjoyed classes more when we acted out small parts in class when studying Shakespeare. It has more impact and the students internalize the main points more than just by reading aloud in class while seated. I believe that more "bonding" occurs between students and it also makes the class feel more personal. When that exists, people tend to help each other more and feel they are working together towards a goal. In this case, forming study groups might be a result.

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kathie | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 6, 2009 at 4:25 PM (Answer #86)

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In reply to #1: I definitely agree that kids today have so much to isolate themselves from the outside world with ipods, cell phones, video games, computer, etc. The culture of this group has become one in which language and vocabulary have changed. Some of my students who get bored are really struggling with language and have low reading levels.

I agree that kids get bored not only with subject matter ( I hated math, and did horrible), but with teaching styles, and assignments. With high school kids, you have to change activities every 20 minutes or so, or you'll lose them.

Depending on where (socio-economic) you teach, you run into the value of education as well. Many of my students come from a background where education is not looked at as something valuable for the future, but a place where kids go before they become of age to work. If parents do not support students, students are not going to care about anything you teach them. That's where you find boredom, and discipline problems.

I agree that the parents are not helping their children value education because they don't model the behavior themselves. Unfortunately, now there are many parents of high school students who grew up being passive viewers of tv, videos, music, etc etc, and now we have their children in the schools. People who passively go through life and lack ambition often don't value education because it takes real effort to learn something and better yourself. They don't want to do anything more than what they feel is necessary. That's the model they give their children. I have three children and the youngest just graduated from the public school system. I value life-long learning, but some of their friends' parents do not and I can see the results in kids who don't care if they go to college or not. A waste of brain power is occurring in this country.

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bkleinhenz | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 6, 2009 at 6:09 PM (Answer #87)

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I consider myself a dynamic teacher, but I honestly struggle at trying to 'engage' seniors when teaching/reading elegaic poetry or sonnets.  The main challenge is the fact they don't understand the language in which the work is written!  How can I 'engage' them when I first need to get them to understand what's being conveyed?  Then, once they 'get it', I don't have much time to get them engaged and involved.  They DO write their own sonnets, in the form I require them to do (Spenserian, Petrarchan, Shakespearean...), but the fact remains: when you're teaching a subject like British literature (EARLY British lit), it's hard to 'engage' them...just getting them to comprehend and analyze the work is like climbing Everest.  Does anyone have any suggestions?  I mean, I've heard from the kids, "if it weren't me teaching it, in the way I do, they'd NEVER get it."  But are they 'bored'?  Yes.  It's almost like, "We like you, but we HATE this class and British lit. Can't you teach American Lit?"

So, now what?  I DO believe the subject matter has a lot to do with whether or not students are bored.  I've been teaching 10 years now and am in my 3rd year of teaching British Lit, and I feel more insecure as a teacher than I did when I was teaching English 9 and American Lit. 

Again, now what?

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englishteacher72 | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted December 7, 2009 at 9:40 AM (Answer #88)

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I think most students are bored because thanks to the Internet, video games, cell phones, television, iPods, etc., they are not used to having to hold their attention on any one thing for too long.  They are constantly entertained by graphics and music, and when they are asked to sit down and listen quietly while a teacher lectures, they cannot do it.  Their attention spans are shot.  This is a huge problem in our school.  Our students are bored at school and want to be entertained rather than learn the material they need.  It's unfortunate, because teachers are left to wonder what they can do and how they can change their curriculum in order to keep their students on task. 

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marcuslicus | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 8, 2009 at 2:18 AM (Answer #89)

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Poster above said: I think we are raising a generation of spoiled and self-indulgent kids who may not make it past the first year in college, the shock and work-load will just be too much.

I am really struggling with how much classrooms have changed over the last decade.  I vary the lessons, make them relevant, know my students' interests and personal lives, sponsor five clubs/sports, and still I feel like I do not ever have their full attention. 

 I have really been thinking about this as I am deeply saddened by it, and I do think what the poster above said is true, evidenced by the fact that only 10% of students who enroll in college graduate.  America's dropout rate also worries me - 75%?  That's as high as during agricultural days when kids dropped out to work the farm, except that now they make it to 10th or 11th grade instead of 8th.

Everything everyone has said is true, but I would like to ask a couple of questions:

1.)What part does the individual's responsibility and self-discipline play in the question, and

2.)When you have done everything right - used the smartboard, iPods, response clickers, varied activities, etc., etc., and it still doesn't work, then what?

I keep thinking back to a Renaissance thinker who said something like, "No amount of excellent teaching can reach a carelss and indifferent mind."  We are careless and indifferent in our country today.

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jcsmith | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 8, 2009 at 5:46 AM (Answer #90)

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Each student is personally responsible for what he or she gets out of any learning situation. If there is no personal motivation, there will be no personal reason to learn.

Teachers are caring people who want to present material for the students to learn. Don't worry! It sounds like you have done everything you could possibly do. You've done your part. Now, each student must do his or her part. 

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mizzmari | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted December 8, 2009 at 4:56 PM (Answer #91)

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I get bored in my English class because the only thing the teacher does is talk and talk for half the class and I'm the type of person that like to do work  instead of just listen to the teacher  talk about the same thing over and over again. Some teachers have a very boring voice, classrooms, and way of teaching new things. the only reason i sit through the  lecturing in English clas is because i have math next and he make the students laugh and he doesn't talk about the same thing over and over. Even my friend who is really bad in algebra  understand it because he make it fun. He will just teach the class a new problem and like 15min we understand it. While his teaching he make jokes and his really funny.( other students want to be in his class!) Teachers don't need technological devices ( just have a commercials...... like ICE CREAM MAKES THE MEAL Woo lol:) ) or color papers, i don't care what the color is it won't get my attention if the teacher is boring.

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gabbygirl95 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 9, 2009 at 1:50 PM (Answer #92)

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Yes because teachers wont make it to wear a student wants to learn. Most just go up say a few words then sit down. And when teachers say to ask about somthing you don't get and then they do the teachers yell at them for asking.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted December 9, 2009 at 4:24 PM (Answer #93)

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I have found that student's boredom stems from one of threefactors; the inexcitement of the lesson do to poor presentation; the student's lack of interest in learning; and/or students having been placed in a class with varrying degrees of needs and levels may have to wait while the lesson is remediated for students. 

Not all lessons a teacher gives are able to be exciting.  Trust me, if there is a way to spice it up I have tried it, including wearing a mop as a wig and oversized Einstein glasses while pretending to accidently spill "my secret serious acid (fake) formula on a student while teaching lab safety.  Yet, when it came to teaching writing there came a time when the students had to do just that, write.  Some students were happy to write and jumped write in while others became bored and started complaining.  No great adjetives of pleasing participles could dangle me past that with my students.

Many students have become placant in their desire to be educated.  They live in a fast paced society and want thinsg to happen fast.  Getting an education is slow process and  means that they must delay gratification.

I am special education teacher.  I teach science and language arts to students of varying levels.  I have had to devise ways to reach a student who picks up on something fast and one who can barely read or write.  Our classrooms are the same way in the general education setting.  Teachers struggle daily to balance the needs of one against the needs of many students.  With the least restrictive environment being a mandatory setting for students with disabilities more of this is going o occur.  I am a strong advocate for my students but I also understand that there are two ends of the spectrum in special education, the student with learning disabilities and the student with academic gifts.  The students in the middle sometimes get bored.  It is a good teacher who finds ways to balance the needs and education of all the students in his or her class.

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swimma-logan | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted December 10, 2009 at 5:08 AM (Answer #94)

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Hey there, I'm not a teacher, I'm a student, and the answer is simple; we're not interested...teachers go into survival mode, they lecture or throw around worksheets, instead of engaging the students...hold discussions or debates, turn it into a game, or make the students teach the class (that works really well actually)

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faithlovehope | Student | (Level 2) Honors

Posted December 10, 2009 at 9:30 PM (Answer #95)

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Most students are realley bored in their classes because they are not interested, others are bored because the class is too easy.

Personally, I enjoy math...in fact I love it...it is my favorite subject, but this year I got a horrible teacher, he talks in monotone, and teaches worse than a child...no, I don't mean to be rude, but the book is my teacher. Since the first day of school (of 2009), I have found it a bore to go to math...getting this teacher broke my heart. I hope my passion for math hasn't completely disappeared. 

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swimma-logan | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted December 11, 2009 at 5:59 AM (Answer #96)

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Welcome to my criminal justice class victoria...I think that in order for teachers to enjoy a class, the teacher has to enjoy teaching it

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crucker | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted December 13, 2009 at 5:03 AM (Answer #97)

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Students become bored partly for a pretty basic reason: they sit most of the day. If the class is small enough, I try to incorporate some kind of moving around, kinesthetic activity into the lesson, like skits (I teach high school English); however, with classes over 20, it becomes more difficult to find room for active movement for people the size of adults.

 

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carriebeatty4 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted December 13, 2009 at 2:08 PM (Answer #98)

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It is very easy to say "it's the teachers' fault." Teachers are not engaging, or assign too much work, or any number of excuses.  What students, teachers, and parents have to realize is education is a partnership.  Students have to be willing to take some responsibility for their own learning.  As a teacher it is NOT my job to teach a student what to think, but how to think and then to put those thoughts into coherent sentences. 

 

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cdeb | Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 14, 2009 at 1:44 PM (Answer #99)

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As a teacher I found out that no matter hard you try to creat a friendly atmosphere for your students and make the lesson as enjoyable and interesting as you can if they are not interested, motivated and organized your effort gets nowhere, you just bump your head against the wall.
It is crystal clear, how can you motivate a passive and bored student? You can but it takes ages, the solution is within the student to help himself to come up. Another point is that there are many students in the classroom they do not know why they are in the classroom, why do the want to learn as in my case English. If you ask them that simple question Why? They have to think for a long time to find the answer, and then you get a one-word answer. They come to class without their books, notebooks, dictionary and you name it. It is you as a teacher that have to try harder to make them interested.

You gotta be a teacher, a psychiatrist , a babysitter, a father, a mother, a police...And at the same time take care of the materials you have to cover. I am always used to teach my students more than they are supposed to. I help them in any way I can, but believe me they get nowhere unless they themselves want to , only then can you make sure your words are penetrating deep inside and touch their hearts.

 

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aferna01 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 14, 2009 at 8:20 PM (Answer #100)

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Students are bored in class because their teachers have not found a way to reach them.  Research shows that a large number of students are kinesthetic learners.  If that is the case why are teachers still lecturing and having students take notes.  My students are constantly moving and taking part in the day's lesson.  Today,  we were every students was engaged.  We were discussing a book and the students were creating tableauxs, interviewing characters, and responding to the text.

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gail979 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 15, 2009 at 4:21 AM (Answer #101)

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Children today are growing up in an entertainment based world.  Their entire lives are digital: from their cell phones, to T.V., to video games, and MP3/iPods. 

When students step into a classroom (unless the school has a high budget) they are not seeing all these technological devices while learning.  Too many teachers are still teaching by lecturing, but students now need more.

In order to keep students engaged, they need to be interested.  Technology interests students.  Giving them the ability to demonstrate understanding of a concept through a PowerPoint presentation is more appealing to them then a paper-pencil test.  Their creativity is brought out and they are more inclined to try their best and be more attentive.  When students see papers in color under an ELMO rather than an overhead, they are more engaged.  The color speaks to them and they have an easier time focusing.

Until allteachers incorporate technology daily into their lessons, students will continue to be bored at school.  Now, is this the teachers' fault? No. Is this the students' fault? No. No one can be to blame that our great nation has developed technology in such a way that it interests young minds.  Older minds just need to do their best to adapt and become learners once again.

Recently at a PD I had an opportunity to see Elmo in action. I was WOWed. However, in a district where computers are barely operational due to budgets, this district will never see it....unless that philanthropist out there donates .....NE1???

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mr-i-answer | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 15, 2009 at 7:34 AM (Answer #102)

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I am going to keep mine short but Answer #6 is kinda right kid get bored cause know in days they would rather be doing other things. Like going to partys, sleeping, or what ever.

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ninja1 | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 15, 2009 at 8:03 PM (Answer #103)

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I am a student in grade 12-therefore I actually KNOW why students are easily bored. I easily get bored in my classes-it's because I (like most of my classmates) have a short attention span. Every teenager is very different. Some learn through using their hands, reading, seeing, interacting...and I can understand how it can be incredibly hard for a teacher to incorporate all these learning ways into their teaching. Try to engage your students in a discussion-not where they have to raise their hands, but can all talk freely. Treat them like adults-Please! And I can promise that they will treat you respectfully also. One of my favorite teachers uses this and the favorite teacher of all but a few that go to my school. Be creative, be funny! You don't need to have fancy technology to keep us engaged-but please don't use one of us to keep the rest of the class interested. The one student you use and all their friends will hate you for it. Take it from someone you know. In my favorite teachers class, I get 90s. In the class with the teacher who always makes fun of me, I get 50s-I don't try in that class-I don't think that teacher deserves the effort. If students are consistently getting low grades in your class, then perhaps its time to change your teaching style. Hope this helps!

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jmtgr1 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted December 15, 2009 at 9:53 PM (Answer #104)

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Make it interesting! I even get bored with some of the subjects we have to teach...so I throw in a story about my childhood that relates to what I am teaching. My students like my stories and I enjoy telling them. Sometimes we just have to get on their level of thinking so we can bring them up to where they are suppose to be.....jm

Have A Great Day!

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kerust | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 16, 2009 at 9:17 PM (Answer #105)

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If a student is bored in their class, then we as teachers need to examine our instructional methods and determine what needs to be changed. All children learn differently. There are visual, auditory, and tactile learners. Having a large classroom with 25 plus students who all learn differently presents a unique challenge to teachers. We have to make learning fun, interesting and incorporate a variety of instructional strategies to reach every student. Children should not be bored in class. If they are, it is often due to a teacher who lacks the desire or commitment to help students reach their full potential. If there is a will, there is a way, right?

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tey | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 17, 2009 at 7:18 AM (Answer #106)

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I am a student in grade 12-therefore I actually KNOW why students are easily bored. I easily get bored in my classes-it's because I (like most of my classmates) have a short attention span. Every teenager is very different. Some learn through using their hands, reading, seeing, interacting...and I can understand how it can be incredibly hard for a teacher to incorporate all these learning ways into their teaching. Try to engage your students in a discussion-not where they have to raise their hands, but can all talk freely. Treat them like adults-Please! And I can promise that they will treat you respectfully also. One of my favorite teachers uses this and the favorite teacher of all but a few that go to my school. Be creative, be funny! You don't need to have fancy technology to keep us engaged-but please don't use one of us to keep the rest of the class interested. The one student you use and all their friends will hate you for it. Take it from someone you know. In my favorite teachers class, I get 90s. In the class with the teacher who always makes fun of me, I get 50s-I don't try in that class-I don't think that teacher deserves the effort. If students are consistently getting low grades in your class, then perhaps its time to change your teaching style. Hope this helps!

As a High School teacher who is well liked by her students, I say this to you;

In that class where you don't try. You are not hurting that teacher, you are hurting yourself. I have had students come to me and say, 'why can't he teach like you?...if he did I'd do as well in there as I do in here.' My response to them goes as follows; Not all people in the world are going to do act in a way that assists your progress in life. Thus, your progress, although supported by some, will always fall back on you. So what if that other teacher is not like me. Be grateful that you at least found one teacher you can relate to and know that even as you do well with me, that is not on me, that is also on you!

So, step out of the 50's mode in that class. So what that the teacher acts like a fool with you... let that be on them. When you get 90's in that class, it will be on you!

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jmtgr1 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted December 17, 2009 at 11:10 PM (Answer #107)

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In reply to all posts on this page:

Teaching does NOT have to be so strict to were it is boring nor does it have to be so timeless that a student gets bored and makes the 50. It is all on how you teach it!

I am not there to be the most well liked teacher in the school. I am there to teach and how I teach it comes back to me with their test results. That is what I look for in a child at any age. The 12th grader made a point. If the teacher sees that 50 and knows that the student is capable of more...then the teacher needs to examine on what he/she needs to change on HOW it is taught.

Why do you think we as teachers are sent to workshops and professional meetings? In order for us to meet the child's needs, we as teachers have to change. That my friends is a fact. Read your history.....jm

 

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jamatters | College Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 18, 2009 at 11:01 PM (Answer #108)

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To sort of sum up and/or add to what everyone has all ready said here...a teacher has to make it matter to the students. A lot of teachers get caught up in following the state (city/school)-mandated curriculum, and NCLB, and preparing for whatever state-mandated test is coming up next, that we forget that our job is to produce critical-thinking citizens for our society.

So, yes, it is important to help the students find motivation to take part in class. Let's face it, it's easier to encourage students with extrinsic motivation (grades, prizes, praise) than it is to produce intrinsic motivation (doing it for their own personal gain).

I actually challenge my students the first week of school every semester -- if they can find an assignment (paper, story, etc) in our class that does not relate to SOMETHING outside of the classroom (the news, their future career, something), then I won't teach it. Enforcing that concept/policy usually ends up with the students "defending" me against each other by the end of the year.

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asp | Student | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 18, 2009 at 11:12 PM (Answer #109)

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I am working as a lecturer in a engineering collage . Most of the student get bored in aclass room .

today there are no. of option for student for learning. while teaching a perticular topic , my opion is that teacher has to give current examples , instresting examples to express that topic. so that student get engage in that.

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rena4u | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted December 19, 2009 at 7:10 PM (Answer #111)

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All the posts are right. I am a teacher and a student (I am a 16 yr. old, 3rd yr high school student).

But we students often get bored in class because some of us already have learned the subject/lesson. Or because we simply are not in the mood of learning or are having a bad day. Another reason is that we don't like the teacher, or some or even all of our classmates. Or we would rather not be in school and/or the class and we would rather be doing something else.

I know majority of the reasons above to be true for me.

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chandisellen | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 20, 2009 at 11:40 AM (Answer #112)

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Boredom in the classroom is a reaction to lack of engagement  - which can be with the subject, the teacher, or both. I have found that having a positive relationship with my students, being interested in them as people, sharing a sense of humour and fostering an atmosphere of mutual respect means that we can 'tough out' some of the topics which are less interesting. I always strive to be enthusiastic and passionate about my subject, and I do employ as much modern technology as my school has access to (Youtube, Smartboards, a bank of bookable PC's) but I tell my classes that our priority is education not entertainment. Usually we end up combining the two.

Exactly, Kiwi! I blieve this is true on any level, but as I've aged, It's become easier for students to accept me. In my first year as a teacher, my philosophy was the same, but since I was only six years older than my students, it was interpreted (I believe) as a 'we are equal in every way' philosophy. Now that I'm a zillion years old, our differences are more obvious.  ;)

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profgoodflower | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 20, 2009 at 11:48 AM (Answer #113)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

One reason reflects the current ubiguitous presence of technology and the instant gratification that goes with it. Students are use to moving from one topic or task in quick time so if the classroom teaching strategy is to teach with one method for an entire period, students will get bored. In today's classroom, multiple strategies must be used to engage the learners.

Another reason is that differentiated learning must be acknowledged and students need variety in teaching methods so that their particular learning strength in tapped. Teaching is complex today and takes a great deal of planning to assure total engagement of all the students.

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amanda1223 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 20, 2009 at 1:29 PM (Answer #114)

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In my elementary classroom, I see most boredom during social studies.  In every other subject area, I am able to connect what we are doing to my students' current lives, interests, and ambitions.  However, the curriculum for social studies for my grade level is state-specific history.  Not even the governor of my state knows the things my fourth graders are required to know.  I know that is the curriculum for several neighboring states as well.

I feel that the social studies curriculum for elementary aged students should be focusing on over-arching themes that then relate to world history, US history, and economics.  These themes would be responsibility, conflict resolution, poverty, integrity, compassion, citizenship...maybe then not only can we more fully engage our students, but also tap into students' prior knowledge to apply those concepts to social studies studied in the upper grades, and possibly even improve the course of human history in the process.

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msteacher203 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 21, 2009 at 5:59 PM (Answer #115)

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Student engagement is a severe problem in today's educational system. There are various ways to increase engagement. I agree that today's students live in a high-speed information age where technology dominates a large percentage of their day. Yes, teachers should be well-versed in different ways of incorporating technology into their classroom. PowerPoints, SmartBoards, and ELMOs are all excellent ways of teaching concepts in a visually ( & possibly auditorally) pleasing way. However, not all teachers have access to this equipment.You can also incorporate technology by creating student projects that relate to technology. For example, have students design a poster of a given character's (or mathematician, historian, etc) MySpace or Facebook page.  They can include a short biography, important quotation, "Top Friends", song or playlist that represents them, etc. Similarly, have students write out texts or aims literary characters would exchange.

In addition, teachers can create review games that are fun. Look up games like Boom, Baseball, Spider, Mastermind...or incorporate game-show ideas like Who Wants to be a Millionaire? Jeopardy or Password. Also, any timed review revs students up. Beyond these steps, teachers must give students real-life applications & reasons for learning. By simply telling them WHY they should be invested in a given topic, half the buy-in process is complete. Last, know your students, especially their interests and motivations.

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meetmeet | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 21, 2009 at 6:51 PM (Answer #116)

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The key to keeping students focused is creating analogies. You have to be able to relate whatever the subject matter is to something that interests them. When I taught poetry, I related it to rap lyrics. I even rapped for them. They thought it was hilarious and all of them were engaged. When I taught story elements, I related them to popular movies. You can find a way to relate almost anything to something that appeals to them. Once you do that, they're hooked!

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cooperbemis89 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 22, 2009 at 7:56 PM (Answer #117)

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All of these post are very true.  You, as an educator, have to be willing to try new methods, sometimes daily, and adjust your classroom to the students who fill it each year.  Society is changing and students of today are not anything like the students of even 5 years ago.  Share your ups and downs with co-workers, read professional writing, and just try different things.  I've been teaching for 20 years and thought I had everything figured out.  WRONG!  This year I am in a low income, 99% Hispanic, 100% male classroom.  Wow!  I am searching for ways to keep the boys interested in school on an hourly basis.  Always try to stay positive and smile. 

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loubookhistory | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 23, 2009 at 6:41 AM (Answer #118)

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As a retired teacher including  teaching reading and language arts to incarcerated youth, a mother of  30 year old who was gifted, an aunt of a 12 year old who says school is  boring I have seen all the reasons a student is bored  Yes technology has changed  My mother back in the  days when Sesame Street first hit TV was asked what changes she saw in her students she replied in  “I now have to stand on my head to teach the sound of h”  I have come  to the conclusion that boredom is an attitude that the student has developed or is developing It can be based on how easy the work is or it is so difficult he is frustrated,  how relevant the subject is, how it is presented or what he brings to the class from his life experiences What this means to the teacher is you have to know yourself and also really get to know your students and do the best you can to engage the student. Standing on your head won’t necessarily teach or engage all your students though your falling might cause a good laugh You may love Power Point but for many it has gotten old Lecturing can be good but don’t drone on Provide a variety of activities One of my professors said you need  99 ways to teach something as there maybe that one child who won’t get it till you do the 99th way. In reality I know we can’t. Lastly  there is the pressure to teach just the facts for tests that  has made teaching difficult to at times not be boring but that’s the way it is

 

 

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seeker1161 | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 23, 2009 at 8:37 AM (Answer #119)

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I have found that most students are bored in class because they aren't engaged in the lesson.  When I lecture, I lose a lot of bodies.  So, what I've begun doing is, limit my lecture time to the first 10-15 minutes of the class, simply to review/introduce the topic of the day, answer any questions (I always have a "bell ringer question to start the lesson) and to begin applying any vocabulary. 

I then guide them through whatever assignment/activity they will be engaged in and coach/model what will happen next.(5 - 10 minutes)

I finally let them loose to "do" the assignment.  I walk around and make sure everyone is on task and engaged with each other or with me.  If I still have people who aren't getting into the assignment, (1, maybe 2 people at this point)  I give them one on one time... which helps them become more confident in their ability to do the work and helps to apply practical examples that are relative to them.

I find that since I've started this practice, even the true "haters" in my science classes, are a little more interested in what they'll be learning on any given day. 

I love the "what are we gonna learn today?" questions I get...

 

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tntrooperswife | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 25, 2009 at 1:13 PM (Answer #120)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

I feel the same way.  As a teacher, I work with kids who are harder and harder to keep attentive.  They are not encouraged at home to read, write, and enjoy the little things.  Instead, they are always watching TV, playing video games, or whatever keeps them busy and out the way of the adults at home.

Sure, some parents are from "the old school" way of thinking.  They try and support their children.  But, where I teach, my students come from deprived backgrounds.  Backgrounds where taking advantage to become better educated is often overlooked.  It's easier to live off the government and to have less, than to get out of the ghetto.

 

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richardl75 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 28, 2009 at 8:03 AM (Answer #121)

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I think students have been really board in classrooms since their conception. I also feel there are classrooms where students are constantly engaged in learning. The key is the teacher. Societies and cultures are constantly changing. Students enter classrooms each year with a different set of experiences and expectations. I believe students have one thing in common that they all have a brain that is desperately seeking knowledge and answers to questions.

Students become board when the information available does not address their questions, interests, nor stimulate curiosity.

The next question is: "How do we keep boardum out of the classroom?"  As a High School teacher of 30 years I know that the teacher is the key. Professional educators must have the skills and knowledge to assess and diagnose their student's needs and orchestrate lessons that stimulate thinking, interest and inquiry. The one essential skill teachers must possess is the ability to ask questions that facilitate higher order thinking. The ability to ask a set a questions that move students from what they know to synthesising and evaluating new information.

How does a teacher make the decisions necessary to ask questions that stimulate inquiry?

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zahnrachel | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 28, 2009 at 9:53 AM (Answer #122)

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In reply to #1:

I feel the same way.  As a teacher, I work with kids who are harder and harder to keep attentive.  They are not encouraged at home to read, write, and enjoy the little things.  Instead, they are always watching TV, playing video games, or whatever keeps them busy and out the way of the adults at home.

Sure, some parents are from "the old school" way of thinking.  They try and support their children.  But, where I teach, my students come from deprived backgrounds.  Backgrounds where taking advantage to become better educated is often overlooked.  It's easier to live off the government and to have less, than to get out of the ghetto.

 

My personal struggle has been keeping the interest of the students while preparing them for a state test that is limited on higher level thinking.  They grow to learn that everything has an A, B, C, or D answer.  Contending with that and the looming "administration" that wants a certain percentage on "a test," and thinks that the only way to do that is to "teach to a test", makes one big classroom of yawns!

However, I do love teaching reading so my kids see the excitement in that and latch on to my love of books.  Perhaps the most effective attention grabber, though, has been my lessons that use a very effective tool...the computer.  I teach in a low economic school, but I do have access to laptops once a week.  Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't, but we all love that day.  When the kids walk in and see them set up, they are excited.  It's my favorite day to teach, as well.  They do what I ask and there are so many resources that I never run out of ideas.  So, I guess my advice is do the best you can to incorporate what they are using at home, or seeing on tv, or playing with technologically.

Zahn

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saralexis | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 29, 2009 at 10:23 AM (Answer #123)

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Students are bored in class because the teachers have not taken the time to get to know atleast one thing about each student individually. A good teacher will find a way to reach each student through a hobby of theirs or a strategy that has worked to keep them motivated.  If a student believes that a teacher doesn't care individually about them, then the student will not make effort in the class to "win" the teachers approval.

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shemsham | High School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted December 29, 2009 at 11:42 AM (Answer #124)

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Many teachers are lecturing too much. They need to use differintiated learning styles to appeal to the kinesthetic,visual, and audio learners.The lesson plan should involve at least three to four activities,and are moi (motivating and interesting). Tap into students talents, and challenge them to use critical thinking.Some students I found lack certain skills in using critical thinking, and it is good to help them thinking critically.Have students make things,dress for certain occasions, sing, play trivia games,create rap songs, and poems.Debates are great. Using technology in the classroom is very helpful.Rearrange the classroom and put students in small groups to do cooperative learning assignments.Relating current events is a real world activity that students can connect to why they are taking the course. Some assignments should involve parents participating.

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shemsham | High School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted December 29, 2009 at 11:49 AM (Answer #125)

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I think students have been really board in classrooms since their conception. I also feel there are classrooms where students are constantly engaged in learning. The key is the teacher. Societies and cultures are constantly changing. Students enter classrooms each year with a different set of experiences and expectations. I believe students have one thing in common that they all have a brain that is desperately seeking knowledge and answers to questions.

Students become board when the information available does not address their questions, interests, nor stimulate curiosity.

The next question is: "How do we keep boardum out of the classroom?"  As a High School teacher of 30 years I know that the teacher is the key. Professional educators must have the skills and knowledge to assess and diagnose their student's needs and orchestrate lessons that stimulate thinking, interest and inquiry. The one essential skill teachers must possess is the ability to ask questions that facilitate higher order thinking. The ability to ask a set a questions that move students from what they know to synthesising and evaluating new information.

How does a teacher make the decisions necessary to ask questions that stimulate inquiry?

I spell it bored instead of 'board.' I also spell it boredom instead of 'boardum.'

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irishbrae | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 30, 2009 at 11:02 AM (Answer #127)

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The best way to get the attention of your students is to learn what they are interested in and build lessons that incorporate those interests. Something as simple as putting current student names into problems on a worksheet can make the students feel more connected to the assignment. Especially if the use of names and the descriptive portion of the problem demonstrates to the students that you know them as people, and not just faces staring at you while you lecture.

Say for example, you are teaching a physics lesson on sound waves. In a farmtown school you might use country music to bring in the lesson. In a large city school, country music may not work, while rap or hip-hop would. Don't use classical just because it is what you like. Before kids want to know you, they want to feel like you know them.

I see quite a few posts here about technology. I work in a 1:1 iniative school where every student has a school-issued laptop to use on campus and at home. (starting with 3rd grade) Technology can certainly increase interest, but it is vitally important that you find ways to teach with technology without allowing it to become a distraction. More and more colleges and universities are moving away from allowing laptops in lecture halls

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mshargaden | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 30, 2009 at 12:46 PM (Answer #128)

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I find that making the curriculum centered around the students helps keep their interest.  I teach writing, and for each unit we learn how to get ideas from our own lives and thoughts.  I think that this creates more interest.

Also, I think that it is important to keep up a steady pace.  Not too fast, or kids will start to feel like tuning out because they can't keep up, but not too slow.  Make sure that the momentum in each unit or for each piece is never allowed to wind down.  I find that three to four weeks max is the time my kids (7th graders) are eager to work on a piece.  After that it is drudgery.  :)

Also, I make sure to teach grammar and editing ONLY in small chunks and ONLY to the kids who need it, while we are working on editing for about two or three days MAX.   Grammar work for weeks on end, when it is decontextualized from kids' writing, is torture...for them AND me.  :)

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vegas417 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 30, 2009 at 5:49 PM (Answer #129)

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I agree with the first post in that children are being raised in a very stimulated environment, and unless schools have the funds to buy the latest technology kids will likely become bored.

I would also like to add that being a teacher for 12 years is really starting to wear me down. Getting the same pay year after year is contributing to my lack of motivation to try new things that take up even more time and money.  It's a very tricky situation.  I realize teachers enter into the profession for the love of educating children, but it really starts to take a toll.

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maximumride | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 1, 2010 at 6:19 PM (Answer #130)

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cause everyone else looks bored, hardly any discussions, not much entusiasm or interesting topics or way lessons are carried out

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ruthahum | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 2, 2010 at 8:03 AM (Answer #131)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

I have realize that students become bored in the classroom because most of the time they do not enjoy hearing a teacher lecture the whole time. Students love to have fun, if you ask a student what they like the most about school I would say that 90% of the time the response you will get is that they like recess, lunch, and PE. Why do you think that is the reason, it is because they have fun. So after observing that after many years of teaching I realized that I need to make learning fun so that my students will want to learn. If learning is not fun many of the students will shut down and not try.

I know when you think of fun you think of totally uncontrolled behaviour and that all you do is party. That is wrong, when I talk about making learning fun I am talking about using creative, fun activities when you teach a certain subject to grab the student's attention.

Do not be afraid to try creative ideas to make learning fun. So many teachers do not know how to teach outside the box of the curriculum. Well, fellow teachers the curriculum is boring and I suggest that you use it as a guide but do not be married to it. Step outside the box and be creative and have fun teaching the subject area to your students. Students need to see an energetic teacher that loves what she does and knows how to make the subject exciting for her students.

I do want to suggest that when you do fun activities with your class you need to set boundaries for the students on behavior.

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easlan | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 3, 2010 at 6:18 AM (Answer #132)

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The major reason why students might get bored in the class is that they are not actually involved in the lesson. If the teacher is the mere transmitter of information without actively engaging students in any part of the lesson, the students will inevitably be confined to boredom. Learning should always be fun. If the classroom environment is totally in teacher's control and students don't ever contribute to the flow of the lesson, learning will take place at a very slow and inefficent pace. What I suggest is that students activley take part in the process of working out the lesson. For example,  providing students a list of activities and and making them choose one will absolutely help them control the class and and therefore they will, in turn, feel valued and respected.

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lakac1971 | College Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted January 3, 2010 at 7:01 AM (Answer #133)

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The reason why students get bored in their classes has sparked many debates in the teachers lounge! I have always thought that there are several contributing factors as to why this might occur. One of the first reasons I think that children, or adults, get bored is because they are either way ahead of where the current lesson is being taught or way behind the lesson and feel stressed. When a student is advanced academically and the lesson that is being presented before them is below where they are they tend to get bored, same as when the student is in need of more intense training and the lesson is too advanced for them. Another important factor in why students get bored is outside factors such as things that might be going on in their home. These things might be taking over their thoughts and causing them to day dream making them "appear" to be bored. The list could go on and on so as you can see the teachers job is very complex!

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ernie406 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted January 3, 2010 at 7:26 AM (Answer #134)

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By using technology to "un-bore" students in the classroom, teachers fall prey to mediocrity and student pressure.  Technology, used as a viable and intelligetnt assistant to learning, can be a helpful tool.  BUT... teachers need to examine their methods, their preparation, and their passion for their subject.  The real reason students get bored is because of incompetent, mediocre, and stupid teachers.  We have let just about anyone into this profession - anyone who can make good-looking copies and have students complete worksheet upon worksheet.  Teaching is an art, and, while all students are not going to take responsibility for learning, a teacher's knowledge of the subject matter, pedegogical preparation, and, most of all, REAL passion for his/her subject matter will make the difference between a boring classroom and one in which students hold interest.  Be a real person to your students - be an example of a mature, responsible, professional, and intelligent ADULT - make sure your students know who you really are as a person and a teacher, husband/wife, father/mother --- they will respect you more for that than showing them pictures and videos on a SmartBoard.

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mrscoop | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 3, 2010 at 8:23 AM (Answer #135)

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I  have taught English in the inner city of Chicago for the last eight years and this question  ("Why are kids bored in the classroom"?) has often been the topic of teacher discussions. My beliefs is that my students are not bored, but burdened. Their primary focus is survival. I learned long ago if a student appears disengaged, it has little to do with a lack of interest in education and more to do with what is happening at home. If we can lessen the poverty aspect and begin to promote educational advancement to parents as well, perhaps we would begin to see less boredom on student faces and more conscientious knowledge-seekers in our classrooms.

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ashley805 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 3, 2010 at 2:52 PM (Answer #136)

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okay im an 8th grader that goes to a low budget school and im gonna tell you straight that the reason we think class is so boring is becus basically all you ppl do is give us more and more hw like yeah we understand we need hw but just lighten it up sometimes and try to be nicer nd not so strict cus come on try looking back, which one did you like better: the fun nice teacher with that gave a reasonable amount of hw and made sure that you understood all the work or the old mean teacher that always gave out extremely long essays nd tons of hw? hm? yaa i thot youd pick the first one.. so try taking my advice and just loosen up nd dnt be too serious just have fun play music lighten up on the hw and trust me youll have an amazing turnout on how your students refer to you as nd treat you. good luck and get back to me with your results (:

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lisansophie | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 4, 2010 at 8:06 AM (Answer #137)

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Many students become bored in their classes because the material is not presented in such a way that they are engaged and motivated.  It is important to know your students;their interests and needs are the key to enagement.  Students motivation is gained when students can see the real world applications of the information.  Teachers may need to look at their own perceptions of what they are teaching and the way that they are teaching it to see where they need to make changes.  Each class is different and the needs change from year to year. 

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mrbergerteach | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted January 4, 2010 at 4:20 PM (Answer #138)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

I work in one of the more difficult districts in the state of NJ. it only takes those few rotten apples to spoil the batch. No matter what you do or say or try they will not budge or change. No matter how many anecdotes you tell about improving your life they will not budge. It is sadly caused by a shaping of a child's life on pop culture, tv, videogames, and lack of substantive motivation in a child's life. The biggest shaper of children in this world are their parents, and when they are for lack of a better term, not of the highest caliber, they pass that trait to their children, not through heredity, but through learned sloth, and since parents do not handle their children accordingly, in some cases they didnt want them, they push them into a system which mandates they must comply, and then let go of the responsibility for those children, because they can't be bothered in some cases. In others however, you have students who are top notch and have parents that inspire them to learn and better themselves, and seek that american dream of outdoing your parents, and succeeding where they had to toil in order to provide for their children. Their children should want for nothing in this world, and be provided all that they can give. This is not the case everywhere. The same with you will not get those bad apples all the time they come and go.

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hij | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 4, 2010 at 5:14 PM (Answer #139)

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you teachers dont make anything interesting

we students get bored because you guys dont let us be ourself

always telling us to be quiet and sit down when we really need to relax and hang out

be cool and just be like us

give that a try

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birdfam01 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 4, 2010 at 5:27 PM (Answer #140)

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you teachers dont make anything interesting

we students get bored because you guys dont let us be ourself

always telling us to be quiet and sit down when we really need to relax and hang out

be cool and just be like us

give that a try

Good feedback, thanks! I have a question for you, though. I am required by my job to teach you about Ancient History. How can I make it interesting, keep you from being bored, and still do my job? Give me some ideas, because I agree, it can get boring, and I would rather have a fun, learning environment! I try to play music when you come in, give you group projects, and provide game reviews, but I still seem to get the "why do we have to learn this stuff" attitude. Ideas?

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samsir | College Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted January 6, 2010 at 2:20 AM (Answer #141)

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 Students are compelled to attend classes one after one without any pause. Transmission system from one subject to another is also defective. I don't think a mere POWERPOINT show can attract them and make the learning process faster. This is a wrong satisfaction a teacher enjoys. If you are not mentally ready, you cannot enjoy even "TITANIC" in the finest theatre of your country.  Most of the students find school interesting because they get to meet their friends there to play, gossip with them all the time but unfortunately no school can allow them to do so. So, they find themselves sitting inside the classrooms doing all the things they hate. It depends on a student’s home-environment whether he/she would enjoy the class. Students exposed to less entertaining objects at home suffer less boredom in class. Students do not feel bored to do the classes of those teachers whom they like and love most. No matter what subject you teach, you must tell them short, less time-consuming funny relevant stories/incidents etc. Call the students by their names. Don't say "your answer is wrong" kind of sentences. Rather you say :"very good try, but let us see if any better answer.."Most of the students come to school and feel thrown away from home. This feeling of insecurity leads to less attentiveness.

 

 

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missjenn | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted January 6, 2010 at 3:41 PM (Answer #142)

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I agree with a lot of great points made in the posts above.

As a young teacher I see two main reasons why students are bored. They are not challenged and invested in/by the subject. Unlike most electives, general education classrooms for core subjects are mandatory for students. While I wish they could see other education systems in the world and feel blessed, I know that the truth of the matter is, they need to see why what you are teaching them in relevant. To challenge students, I find asking them to make connections within their primary discourses a good way to start to get them thinking about a topic. Students do bring their own life experience to the education table and I think this is sometimes forgotten. Ask them to make connections and suggest supplemental texts (for the English classroom this is easy, for other subjects it would work as well with effort.) By having the students incorporate their lives and interests yet also using the problem solving skills to identify then synthesize information for a connection, accomplishes a lot.

Yet if you have a first period class at 7:20 in the morning, it may not be boredom... just lack of sleep.

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kelbrown | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 7, 2010 at 9:25 AM (Answer #143)

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I think that it is extremely important for us to realize, as teachers, that we would not be able to stay seated and remain quiet for an extended period of time.  Think how many times we are in conferences and we will often talk to our table mates because of boredom.  Isn't that what many of our students are doing.  I am trying to figure out a way to get my students up and moving them around more in the classroom.  I know that this may make my classroom a bit more noisy but if it they are more engaged and therefore learning more it is going to be better for them and therefore better for me in the long run.

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michaelinewp | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 8, 2010 at 4:17 AM (Answer #144)

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I believe that boredom in class is generally created due to boring classes. Today's students, in their instant gratification, technologically savvy world, are rarely asked to focus for long periods of quiet time outside of classrooms. Droning lectures, sit in your seats and take notes activities, and read the material and then take the test options rarely meet the needs of even the most intelligent and highly motivated students.

Working in a progressive school has taught me that students involved in and invested in their own learning tend to stay more focused and interested AND master concepts and skills at a hgier level than their peers in traditional classrooms. Cooperative learning activities, self-selected/self-directed projects, the use of technology as a tool for both learning and for assessing learning, studying and then appealing to varied learning styles all help to prevent the classroom from becoming one more part of the mundane. It is more work for me as a teacher and my classroom is often noisy and full of movement. There are still those children who need an extra helping of "whatever it takes" , but overall, I find more students engaged in and responsible for their own learning in an active and engaging environment.

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lynniejo | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 8, 2010 at 5:52 AM (Answer #145)

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I agree with the other posts.  Children are bored in class either because the material being taught is boring or they need to be challenged.  When teaching something that you think is boring, try to come up with interesting ways to teach it.  There are numerous places to find help coming up with ideas.  You can use the internet, fellow teachers, or let the students help come up with the lesson.  You would be surprised at what students can come up with to help with a lesson.  I just feel that students will be more engaged if the material is interesting or they had a say so in how the lesson takes place.

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rhanson2969 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted January 8, 2010 at 12:46 PM (Answer #146)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

I think that all of the responses had excellent points and I hope I am not repetitive.  However, I feel the main issue for students' boredom is the failure to connect.  It is the failure to connect with the subject matter and even with the teacher.  I have the best results with my 7th and 8th grade students when I connect what we are doing to what's important in their life, when I ensure that the assignments we are doing are authentic.

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poisiden | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 13, 2010 at 8:19 AM (Answer #147)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

It's because the teachers and some students don't connect.

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emk | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted January 14, 2010 at 6:40 AM (Answer #148)

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Many of these postings point, quite appropriately, to the lack of student engagement, and to the need for technological sophistication in content delivery.

Yet I believe that the number one reason for boredom these days is that the overload of accessible information has made our students a bit numb.  They need to find their passion and we need to design curriculum that is open and flexible enough to allow for their own interests to be persued.

Course content needs to be painstakingly re-examined to see if it is relevant to the students' needs in the 21st century.  If it is, then perhaps a new delivery method which appeals to them will be the best choice for now.  But if our content is too fact-based or the skills we teach are irrelevant, we need to be very creative in finding ways to ignite a spark of interest in learning in our students and the only way to effectively do that (and do justice to their genuine needs) is to re-imagine our curricular pathways to address student needs, interests and passions; otherwise, we're the ones holding them back.

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mjlamonea | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 14, 2010 at 8:14 AM (Answer #149)

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Every single person has hit the nail on the head in different ways.  I believe, this is a trickle-down effect.  I am in Virginia, and from day one, we are pushed to start content right away.  Forget all of the classroom management time.  We have a test in 4 1/2 weeks and you have to know this.  If our scores come in too low, we are called out and it really takes away from the passion of teaching.  As a teacher, I see the time to be creative with classes and content taken away.  My students need to know this, this and that by this time or else.  This pressure has caused teachers to lose their passion and energy towards something that they love to do.  You end up having to do less exciting lessons.  It is very frustrating.

What I do, do is, I take quick breaks during class and have the students stand up and do jumping jacks or something to get their blood moving.  I find myself having to do it too. 

If we don't have support from our superiors, then it is hard to have a classroom that looks and sounds like a class that is learning and understanding the content.

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jmsprof | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 16, 2010 at 4:42 PM (Answer #150)

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Within class students need to connect to the content being presented. It is the responsibility of the student to focus, however it is the responsibility of the teacher to present the information in a manner that will grab their focus. Presenting the material in a manner that will allow the student to become engaged with the material. Having fully engaged students is the key to their success. It therefore is the teachers' responsibility to create lessons that are diverse and engaging in implementation so as to motivate student to stay focused and involved with the lesson being presented.

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cameragirl24 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 16, 2010 at 7:02 PM (Answer #151)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

  Because they are sitting at a desk and being drilled about the subjects. There is no hands-on-activities going on like there is in early childhood programs. Children learn best when they are doing hands-on-activities that are fun and interesting. They will remember the concept when it is shown in a creative way.

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millertime09 | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 17, 2010 at 8:44 AM (Answer #152)

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I feel it is a combination of many things.  First, and foremost, is the teacher.  The comment about taking a look in the mirror could not be more true.  It is the teacher's responsibility to make sure the students are engaged. Students must see a relevance of what you are teaching to their own lives.  Having said that, we do have an uphill battle.  It is difficult to engage students that spend their lives playing video games, texting, and watching MTV.  I find that over the years I have taught I see more and more students that can not delay gratification, want the simple answer, and want it now.  They find it difficult to dig deep into the material and themselves.  It is also imperative that the teacher establishes a relationship with the students.  It's cliche, but true: "Kids don't care how much you know until they know how much you care."

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shaify | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 18, 2010 at 12:53 AM (Answer #153)

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hello this is shaify,i m a student of class +1....most of student get bored in their classrooms cause they feel ir bore...now everything is advanced children find entertainement like internet browsing,chatting,ipods,mp3,going pubs bla bla bla so interesting instead of studies mostly boys.................the reason is that we r forced to study even if we don't want to be.....a teacher should teach the student according to their mood.......i m not trying to say always student should be heard but they should be heard sometimes..........if the teacher behave like friends with they will also co-operate......n they should teach them in an entertiang style...........my ownn english teacher does so thats why we co-operates with her and also respects her more than any other teacher........if the chapter is boring and feels that students are getting bored feeling sleepy she cracked a joke on the basis of chapter not out if chapter in this way everybody took interest in that chapter...b.bye

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fawadphysics | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted January 18, 2010 at 1:22 PM (Answer #154)

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I agreed with u.Teacher should be friendly.But i think teacher should also keep the limit.Teacher shouldn't be so frank that student 4got that they have to learn something or for what purpose they are in the school. I think teacher should be friendly and use modern techneaques as well as speak modernly and should have a powerful skill of lecturing and command on communication with students and make his/her students creative. What do u think?Post me

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fawadphysics | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted January 18, 2010 at 1:27 PM (Answer #155)

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In reply to #1:  Because they are sitting at a desk and being drilled about the subjects. There is no hands-on-activities going on like there is in early childhood programs. Children learn best when they are doing hands-on-activities that are fun and interesting. They will remember the concept when it is shown in a creative way.

exactly.I totally agreed with you.

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dlarmstrong | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 18, 2010 at 5:25 PM (Answer #156)

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As a high school English teacher, I have noticed that many students are not truly learning how to think in their day to day lives. They are told, often through media as well as in classrooms, what and how to think. This is BORING! Teaching students HOW to think as opposed WHAT to think leads to great discussion, less boredom on both sides of the spectrum, and interesting classes!

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studentneedshelp | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 18, 2010 at 6:34 PM (Answer #157)

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In my american history class, all we do is watch videos. That is what bores me to death. If you can find a way to get around making your students sit through a video, do it. I don't pay attention to them, so I don't learn from them. I learn from interaction. If you can teach me by making me get out of my seat and do something, you are my favorite teacher. And I would like to say that students don't learn from homework. They will bring it back complete, but its not their work. They found the answers on the internet. If you can't teach everything you need to in the time you have, you are not a good teacher. Don't give homework. We sit at school for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week. WE DON'T NEED ANY MORE OF IT! I understand studying for tests, but we have plenty of time to do stuff in class.

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 22, 2010 at 9:13 AM (Answer #158)

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A combination of factors.  They have limited control over the classes they take and which teachers they have.  Much of the material of traditional classes they have trouble finding relavance for in their daily lives, and/or do not know how to apply it so that it is relevant.  Many teachers are excellent in terms of knowledge of subject matter, but lack presentation skills that stduents would call interesting. Many teachers also focus on the structure of a classroom and curriculum, enforcing rules to the point that a positive learning environment that stimulates student interest is stifled.  Many kids are "plugged in" to texting and interactions that seem at all times more interesting than what they are supposed to be learning.

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kittie92 | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 25, 2010 at 8:49 PM (Answer #159)

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We students become bored with the lessons because we are not clicking to them and if we do not understand what it is about or makes us curious then we do something that intertains us, like texting in class. My English teacher plays music and it makes us focus on the subject he teaches. It helps us some how contect to what he is saying and we understand. If it's a quiet, dull room then we are either sleeping, passing notes, texting, or listening to our mp3's. Just play music or get the class to join in on the subject. Make the subject fun for us students.

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astrokits | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted January 29, 2010 at 2:18 AM (Answer #160)

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I m a student n i say maybe it is becoz the teachers r overdoing explaining wht to do n wht not to do in the Board exams...n also when they concentrate on a few naughty students...asking difficult questions tht require thinking pleases at least me...

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asiedua | Student, College Freshman | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 29, 2010 at 1:14 PM (Answer #161)

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I believe it depends on the interest of the child.if one does not feel too good about a course; he or she finds the class very boring regardless of the fact that the tutor is trying his possible best to bring the best out of the students.this makes the student turn a deaf ear to the tutor thus making the tution boring for the individual

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kapokkid | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted April 19, 2010 at 7:50 AM (Answer #162)

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One of the things I think about and try to find ways to deal with is that the very structure of most schools does not always encourage students to be engaged in class or interested.  They often have very little freedom to choose what they want to learn, so you have already taken away that motivation.  They also often have little freedom to influence how they learn what they are being forced to learn, so that chips away further.  Then they are growing up in the most stimulating environment ever seen on earth (tv, internet, etc.) and you are asking them to be engaged in a classroom often for 45-55 or more minutes and wonder why they struggle with it?

A second concern that comes up is that they are always going to be compelled by what is most urgent to them.  If they have a test the following period and they know it is a big deal and will affect their grade (which to many means their future) they are going to be compelled to think about and try and study for that test, regardless of what you might be doing in your class.

Self-reflection can be a big help and modifying your classroom practices can also be a big help.  But remembering that you are going to lose many of those battles unless your school is structured in a non-traditional way is also helpful at times.

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taiba3 | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted May 21, 2010 at 12:17 AM (Answer #163)

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Children today are growing up in an entertainment based world.  Their entire lives are digital: from their cell phones, to T.V., to video games, and MP3/iPods. 

When students step into a classroom (unless the school has a high budget) they are not seeing all these technological devices while learning.  Too many teachers are still teaching by lecturing, but students now need more.

In order to keep students engaged, they need to be interested.  Technology interests students.  Giving them the ability to demonstrate understanding of a concept through a PowerPoint presentation is more appealing to them then a paper-pencil test.  Their creativity is brought out and they are more inclined to try their best and be more attentive.  When students see papers in color under an ELMO rather than an overhead, they are more engaged.  The color speaks to them and they have an easier time focusing.

Until allteachers incorporate technology daily into their lessons, students will continue to be bored at school.  Now, is this the teachers' fault? No. Is this the students' fault? No. No one can be to blame that our great nation has developed technology in such a way that it interests young minds.  Older minds just need to do their best to adapt and become learners once again.

i do agree with you . because of so many digital facilitiesand so many other activities.students are not taking interest in their lectures.bt for me bitter and naked reality is that now in that modern era we have to change our method of teachings.thats y i agree with u.

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted May 31, 2010 at 8:19 AM (Answer #164)

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Students get bored because they need change. Sometimes teachers teach the same way, every day and this gets way too monotonous. I think it is important for teachers to vary instruction by using group work, individual work, computer time, educational games, etc. When all of these things are utilized students will not get bored. They will expect something new everyday.

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mizzwillie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted November 14, 2010 at 9:21 AM (Answer #165)

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For middle school students, they must be engaged and not allowed to tune out. For the teacher, that means that any lecture must be very short, use technology or at least use color-coded notes, and directions must be very clear.  I find that using Kagan strategies in lecture activities helps me keep the students on task, focused, and each is responsible for his/her own answer.  Allowing them to use a partner to compare notes and ask questions of each other part way through the lesson before each pair presents a question to the class also keeps them attentive. Teachers truly need to keep each activity focused and have a variety of activities to teach the same few important ideas for that day.  For all students, but especially my honors students, they truly need to be able to discuss, argue, debate, relate the idea to something else, and especially to learn to defend their ideas without getting angry and respect those who disagree. I did not often have students tell me they were bored.

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sqrrtofnegone | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted June 26, 2012 at 11:18 AM (Answer #166)

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Seems to me all of us, as we approach adulthood, need to develope a bundle of skills and interests so that we can entertain ourselves as necessary.  There comes a day when one announces to the Universe, "I'm bored!", and there's no one around somehow obligated to entertain us.  As with rain so with boredom, into every life some must fall. 

What would students, in their air conditioned classrooms and frequently texting in class, and preening and promenading in the social crucible of the cafeteria, advise laborers - grunting and sweating in the vegetable fields of California's Central Valley picking vegetables students eat - do to combat bordom?  The young sailor standing watch at 2:30 a.m. on a U.S. Navy ship in the North Arabian Sea?  A young Marine standing guard at the perimeter of his base camp in Afghanistan?

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rachellopez | TA , Grade 12 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted November 25, 2014 at 5:16 PM (Answer #173)

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Having been a student for 12 years I can say that the only boring lessons were the ones that I had to sit and do nothing in. If a teacher lectures the WHOLE class it becomes really boring and I become uninterested. Teachers need to have students interact with them and their peers; keep students busy, but make it fun.

Also, people learn in different ways. Some people learn better by doing, others by listening, and others by seeing. There has to be a variety of lesson plans that way everyone can benefit. Maybe one day you can show a video, the next day do group work, another day take notes and lecture. You just have to have a variety and ask students questions; that way they are engaged. 

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kemorton | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 2, 2009 at 11:51 AM (Answer #2)

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Children today are growing up in an entertainment based world.  Their entire lives are digital: from their cell phones, to T.V., to video games, and MP3/iPods. 

When students step into a classroom (unless the school has a high budget) they are not seeing all these technological devices while learning.  Too many teachers are still teaching by lecturing, but students now need more.

In order to keep students engaged, they need to be interested.  Technology interests students.  Giving them the ability to demonstrate understanding of a concept through a PowerPoint presentation is more appealing to them then a paper-pencil test.  Their creativity is brought out and they are more inclined to try their best and be more attentive.  When students see papers in color under an ELMO rather than an overhead, they are more engaged.  The color speaks to them and they have an easier time focusing.

Until allteachers incorporate technology daily into their lessons, students will continue to be bored at school.  Now, is this the teachers' fault? No. Is this the students' fault? No. No one can be to blame that our great nation has developed technology in such a way that it interests young minds.  Older minds just need to do their best to adapt and become learners once again.

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drmonica | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted October 2, 2009 at 1:55 PM (Answer #3)

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When students are bored, teachers have GOT TO look in the mirror and say, "What am I doing to plan lessons that bore my students?" This is extremely difficult for most teachers to do. I didn't learn to do it until I went through National Board Certification and had to videotape my classroom.

There are many strategies that middle and high school teachers can use to make lessons interesting and participatory, using technology or not. However, most of them, especially high school teachers, fall back into the mode of teacher talking then students doing seatwork. This is intensely boring to students.

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scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 2, 2009 at 2:30 PM (Answer #4)

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Many teachers in my high school do what is easiest for them, lecture from notes, which is not effective with a typical high school student.  I try to vary my instruction practices and get as many students involved as possible.  If a teacher is not willing to vary his/her methods, then students will continue being bored.  Other teachers and I combine discussions with pair-work, fish bowl activities, etc.

I once heard the statistic that most humans' attention-span is their age in minutes; so a 15-year-old student has an effective attention-span for 15 minutes.  If this is true, then it is imperative that teachers plan a variety of activities for each class period.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 2, 2009 at 3:32 PM (Answer #6)

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The previous posts were really strong.  I absolutely agreed with them.  I think that the one which resonated me the most was the idea of looking in the mirror and confronting one's own notion of self.  I think that there has to be some time spent on understanding both what we teach, but also how students learn.  I am at the point in my own teaching where teaching the skills of metacognition are about as vital as teaching content.  When students are able to possess the vocabulary and ideas which allow them to better understand how they learn, the type of learner they are, and the different models of learning where their strengths reside and where their weaknesses need attention, I think we will see more student interest generated in the curriculum and classroom.  The reason being that student voice is authenticated and resonant in a classroom where students are able to possess their own intellectual voice that helps to stress how they can learn content and how instruction can be more relevant and meaningful to them.

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krishna-agrawala | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted October 2, 2009 at 6:09 PM (Answer #7)

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Getting or not getting bored in class is very much dependent on students' interest as well as motivations. It is also dependent on the the way the teacher teaches and handles the class.

Students, or any one else is more interested in having a good time right now, rather than doing things that give no pleasure immediately but prepare you to develop yourself so that you are in a better position to have a good time. Studies fall mostly in this second group of activities. In addition, frequently the students are not even able to see how things that are being taught in the class will be helpful to them in their later lives. No wonder most of the students all over the world don't really enjoy their studies, and get bored in their classes. However, there is no doubt that students who still apply themselves to their studies are more likely to do better in their lives.

To address this issue teachers and education administration needs to first design the syllabus select the text books in a way that minimizes topics that are not going to be of value for most of the students. Such subjects and topics should be reserved only for higher education. It would help also if the course and text book also help the students to understand how the subjects taught will help them in later life. Finally the role of the teacher actually teaching in the class is critical. The primary requirement is to explain the subject clearly in line with level of the student. In addition, the ability to make the teaching and learning interesting and enjoyable is also very important.

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dbello | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted October 2, 2009 at 10:22 PM (Answer #8)

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Students who become bored in class do so because they are disconnected with the subject matter. Whether due to the students' excelerated understanding or the lack there of, if the relevance of the subject matter has been lost, students will become bored.  If this is the case, an educator must find a way to ignite their curiousity.  Obviously, 'not all subjects being equal' every educator blazes a different path.  Having said that, I think if students believe their teacher really wants to hear what they have to say, they are more willing to engage themselves in the classroom discussion.  Educators must remember, it's not always what you teach...it's how you teach it....

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted October 2, 2009 at 11:58 PM (Answer #9)

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Boredom in the classroom is a reaction to lack of engagement  - which can be with the subject, the teacher, or both. I have found that having a positive relationship with my students, being interested in them as people, sharing a sense of humour and fostering an atmosphere of mutual respect means that we can 'tough out' some of the topics which are less interesting. I always strive to be enthusiastic and passionate about my subject, and I do employ as much modern technology as my school has access to (Youtube, Smartboards, a bank of bookable PC's) but I tell my classes that our priority is education not entertainment. Usually we end up combining the two.

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mr-angel | College Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 3, 2009 at 11:42 AM (Answer #10)

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Students must take ownership of thier own education!  Why do they get bored?  Maybe the way the material is being presented is boring.  In my experience, High school students will do what you set them up to do.  If you engage a kid with a cool demonstration, he is much more likely to listen to the principles behind that demo. Teachers need to not be afraid of teaching the same concepts in different ways.  One quick example.  I was reviewing the states of matter with my 10th grade biology students.  Very simple matter for most of them, could be done in a "boring" way by listing each state and writing examples. We chose to make ooblick (2 parts corn starch, 1 part water) and try to identify it as a solid or liquid.  For those of you who have never messed with a non-newtonian fluid, it is liquid unless you apply pressure to it and it becomes more solid.  Youtube has some interesting clips with people running on these liquids.  Much more interesting than a list of solid, liquid, gas... .zzzz. zzzzz....

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Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 3, 2009 at 1:25 PM (Answer #11)

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I attended a seminar recently. I was forced to sit in a chair for an hour and listen to a speaker who talked at length, quite knowledgably, about a subject that related to my life in no way at all. Was I bored? Yes, indeed. Because I was a student for an hour? No. Because I'm a human! So, first and foremost, students are people, too!

In any class, the person who is doing the talking is doing the learning. The "sage on the stage" method of instruction is the least effective, research shows. To be engaged, students must be active, physically and mentally. They need to move physically rather than be confined to one space for an extended period. They need to think and speak, rather than listen passively. They need to act.

Lessons must bridge the gap between "the world in here" and the world out there--the real world of their real lives. Creative lesson plans are a must to accomplish this. Stories like Freedom Writers demonstrate the power of making this real-world connection. The reality link can be accomplished in lots of ways, though, without elaborate arrangements.

Human beings are social creatures, regardless of their ages. Being cut off from all social interaction in a classroom guarantees problems and disengagement. Students will engage and learn a lot from each other when the teacher engineers the right climate and provides organization and direction.

Incorporating any form of technology into the classroom is effective because it bridges the gap to the real world where we all live. Incorporating interactive technology resources turns students into doers. Allowing students to use technology resources together to solve problems meets their need to socialize. Using technology iin the classroom is effective because it meets these basic human needs, not because it is hip or cutting edge. These same needs can be met in many other ways through creative lesson planning.

 

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dkgarran | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 3, 2009 at 1:46 PM (Answer #12)

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Another reason why students are often bored in their classes is because the material is often presented in the same way day in and day out. Many teachers don't even consider Gardner's idea of multiple Intelligences. Students who are visual learners are going to tune out a lecture. Those who are bodily-kinesthetic learners need to get up, move around and do something, be it building models or skits. Interpersonal learners have an innate need to work with others and process information in a group. The best teachers are those whose lessons are multi-modal. This allows students to access and process information in the manner in which they are most comfortable. Hence, they will find their classes more interesting and they will have a better understanding of the material being presented.

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rugator | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted October 3, 2009 at 3:31 PM (Answer #13)

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All terrific, insightful responses. I especially connected with #9. I think the most important lesson I've learned (and tried to incorporate in my teaching) is to show my students that I care about them and respect them. When they know this, I've found that they'll "run through walls" for you.

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judsonsmith | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 3, 2009 at 4:25 PM (Answer #14)

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From the very first class about teaching, that we sign up for in college, we learn about keeping students "engaged".  This applies to students from K-12 and even into college. There are so many resources available for teachers today and there is no reason why students shouldn't be engaged.  Students shouldn't be subjected to sitting in their seats the whole class period and have the expectation that they will stay focused and not get bored.  There are many engaging activities that can be done.  My system really harps on letting kids do a lot of group work and letting the classroom have centers.  I teach three 90 minute 5th grade math blocks per day.  I usually have some sort of math centers and/or manipulatives set up for the children.  Most adults could not sit there, in a chair, for 90 straight minutes and not get bored.  How can we expect children to be able to do that.  To keep students from being board, keep them moving, keep their hands busy, and you will see a big difference.  You will be amazed at how you can just slightly differ each center and it will keep the students from being bored and they will still learn the necessary standards that you are required to teach.

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rolltide12 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 3, 2009 at 9:02 PM (Answer #15)

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At some point we need to stop worrying about if the student is entertained.  We cannot compete with MTV and iPhones and $100,000,000 Hollywood movies. 

We need to send a message that each teacher will present the material in a way they see best.  If we are preparing students for college or work or the military we need to help them realize that its not about being entertained.

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krishna-agrawala | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted October 3, 2009 at 9:43 PM (Answer #16)

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I believe there is a lot of difference between making studies interesting and entertaining students. A cough syrup need not compete with Coca Cola in taste, but no harm in making it as tasty as possible, without affecting its medicinal properties.

It is not enough if a teacher presents the material in a way he or she sees best. A teacher must be able to present material in a way which is really good enough.

Even in military also soldiers need to be motivated. A unmotivated soldier who is expected to do his duty just mechanically is not an effective soldier.

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mahles32 | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 3, 2009 at 9:56 PM (Answer #17)

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In my experience in an inner city school a student will say he or she is bored when they either don't want to do the work, or the work is too difficult for them. I realize in some schools that when a student says they are bored maybe they arent being challenged enough, but this is not the case in most inner city schools. I have found that by taking the student a side and asking them why they are bored I am able to get to the root of the problem. Most times its that they dont understand what we are doing at all in class and are too embarassed to ask questions. I fix this by taking some time, while the other students are working, to go over problems one on one with the student. Its very helpful to give continuous positive reinforcement. Let the student know they are on the right track and if they fail to do something correctly, explain to them its alright, just take your time and try it again.

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snsuber | Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 3, 2009 at 10:54 PM (Answer #18)

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I agree with many of the points previously made, but numbers 15 and 17 are the only two that follow my intial gut reaction to the question. I truly believe that a teacher must do all that is possible to engage the students (as the other 15 people said before me); however, I believe the true problem right now in American education hits on the lines of what 15 and 17 said.

There is a definite trend in teacher education and professional development for teachers to work with Multiple Intelligences and get the kids up and about to engage them. I know that I do these things in my classroom and many of my colleagues do also, but we are still stumped by probably about a third of our students who just don't seem to care.

Our students are growing up in a world that teaches them that they never have to take the responsibility for anything. Burn yourself with hot coffee at the McDonald's drive thru? Sue McDonald's. Why would they make their coffee so hot anyway? Slip on a wet floor at Wal-Mart with a caution sign right in front of you? Sue Wal-Mart. What were they thinking cleaning their floors? Bored in English class? Gotta be the teacher's fault. How dare they not make this stuff more interesting?

Some of this engaging education hoopla is really important and some of it is actually a song and dance that actually takes away from true learning. Perhaps we should trust the trained professional to know when to choose which, and we should expect our children to realize that their education is their responsibility. Sometimes students just have to go home and memorize those multiplication tables. No song. No dance. Just learning because the student wants to learn and needs to learn for future success.

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kelticlinkin | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 4, 2009 at 8:02 AM (Answer #20)

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I agree with most on this topic. I think there are a plethora of reasons why a child may be bored in class. Nevertheless, a teacher must understand that they must vary their style of teaching to the class and differentiate their instruction. They must get to know each of their students and their interests. They must understand that the child should be given the opportunity to learn for themselves and that direct instruction is a thing of the past. They must understand the the curriculum their counties provide to them are guides, and not gospel. Varying instruction, allowing for different students styles of learning to take place in the classroom, and interrelating content are imperative to prevent boredom. However, I will also say that some of the onus is also on the child to prevent their own boredom. The teacher can not be held ultimately responsible for "entertaining" the student while in class. The student learner must take time to gain knowledge of the content on their own, to become more familiar, and therefore able to ask questions and participate in class in order for the differentiation to matter.

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ringer-bill | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 4, 2009 at 11:46 AM (Answer #21)

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Do you know why most students are really bored in their classes?

The question is asked in an effort to gain teacher insight regarding this issue.

  We live in a visual world, yet literature is typically NOT a visual media.  Only by making literature relavent to students will we have a chance at getting them "hooked" on it or excited about reading.

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mrtoad | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted October 4, 2009 at 7:19 PM (Answer #22)

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I teach in an inner city school where many students find summer vacation so boring that, when autumn finally comes, they are happy to be back in school.  I have often wondered how they could possibly be so bored when most of them have easy access to cable TV, video games, the internet, etc.  My experience suggests that these young people become bored at home in spite of all of the wonderful sensory experiences that modern technology is able to deliver because they are often unable to make television, the internet and video games relevant to their daily life.  Generally speaking, I have found that when students grasp the relevance of any course of study to their everyday lives, boredom evaporates and they become motivated learners.

Helping students become engaged, thoughtful learners seems to require a willingness on the part of educators to help students find relevance on an individual basis when necessary, because the reasons for their boredom are legion.

A word of caution:  There is an element in learning that is, often necessary, and generally not fun because the relevance is not part of the learner's immediate experience.  Such is the case with a piano student who is required to learn his/her finger exercises.  He/she knows that those exercises create "muscle memory" of musical patterns in the fingers which ultimately lead to learning new music faster, but most students find the exercises boring until they experience the relevance.

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jtelese | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 5, 2009 at 1:09 PM (Answer #23)

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Children become bored when their curiosity and or creativity are stifled by the curriculum, or the teacher.  Teachers when they capitalize on their students' curiosity will students engaged.  Getting to know students is the first step to engaging students in the learning process.  Instruction should have value and relavance to the student.  For example, when I taught Algebra I in a high school near Bryan, TX, I looked for interesting applications of algebrai concepts.  I found one in an every day magazine.  The story with maps and other diagrams was about how to calculate the size of an air conditioner for a home.  Well, one student who was bored and never did assignments,  until that day, became engaged and was the first to turn in the project.  When he did, he happened to mention how much he enjoyed working on the project because it was what his father did; he was an A/C repair man.  From that day on, this student worked his algebra assignments. 

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thewritingteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted October 5, 2009 at 4:22 PM (Answer #24)

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My goal in the classroom is to make every piece of literature RELEVANT to my students' lives. It's sometimes a challenge, but there is always a way to do it. The hallmark of great literature is universal themes and values, and those are timeless. It's fun for me as a teacher to see my students connect with literature because they see why it matters to them. (The best example is in Gulliver's Travels. We compare the Liliputians' voting criteria to the criteria most US voters use when casting a vote. Is there really any difference between the best rope-dancer and the candidate with the best hair?)

It does require that I stay on top of both current events and pop culture, but it is worth the effort. I also create Facebook groups for my classes---and I'll periodically post on a student's wall. They love it---which makes them want to put forth the effort in class.

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lgriff | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 5, 2009 at 6:09 PM (Answer #25)

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Students are not challenged in the classrom these days.  Some teachers do what is best for them instead of the students.  With all the extra paper work that teachers have to deal with now, whether it pertains to behavior or academics, the thought of assigning extra work to students who need (academically), or deserve it (to challenge), seems like a headache. 

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Lorraine Caplan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted October 6, 2009 at 5:57 AM (Answer #26)

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It was John Dewey who said, "Begin with the child." That is something I try to never forget. It's about making connections with the student's world, his or her interests, personality, family, experiences, and so on. None of us can find meaning in anything unless we can connect it with ourselves.  There is good brain science to support this, which makes Dewey's idea even more impressive.  We now know that nothing goes in unless it can connect with something already in the brain. Even a lesson on grammar can connect with the student, by using examples that are relevant to the student's life, or by using the student's own writing as examples.  There is no content area in which we cannot make a connection with the student. 

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Michelle Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 6, 2009 at 12:53 PM (Answer #27)

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Many times we fail to address the different learning styles of our students and also forget that many times we have to establish connections to build the schema that many students lack. At times, we assume that they connect the information that we are bringing not knowing that the minute they dissociate from it, we have officially "lost the kid".

Many teachers still believe erroneously that we are supposed to always provide whole group instruction driven by what test scores revieal. Instruction should be skill-based, meaningful, rich with feedback and driven by research. When we deviate from that, we are literally teaching a book or a unit which will lead us nowhere.

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michelle1121 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 6, 2009 at 3:51 PM (Answer #28)

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I think children get bored because a great deal of children learn in different ways and typically most teachers, teach in the auditory sense.  A great many  children tune out a teacher after so many minutes.  Americans are not known for being great listeners we tend to be more tactile.  Meaning hands on.  The children especially the younger ones like to manipulate items, move about and experiment not just be lectured to.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 7, 2009 at 8:04 AM (Answer #29)

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When students are bored, teachers have GOT TO look in the mirror and say, "What am I doing to plan lessons that bore my students?" This is extremely difficult for most teachers to do. I didn't learn to do it until I went through National Board Certification and had to videotape my classroom.

There are many strategies that middle and high school teachers can use to make lessons interesting and participatory, using technology or not. However, most of them, especially high school teachers, fall back into the mode of teacher talking then students doing seatwork. This is intensely boring to students.

As a longtime high school and middle school English teacher, I have long since come to the conclusion that you cannot please everyone no matter how hard you try. Many students are totally turned off by the thought of attending English class or participating in virtually any kind of reading, writing, or discussion of whatever subject may be at hand. I find most students do enjoy visual presentations, i.e. movies and videos. Naturally, these non-written forms cannot become the backbone of an English class, but I do try to use them more than most English teachers. Since today's students have grown up in the computer age, I believe the use of PC and laptop assignments--whether Internet or non-Internet based--are also more student-friendly and more often receive positive responses than pencil and paper work. Obviously, the teacher is out of luck if PCs or laptops are not available or allowed in the classroom, but keeping up with the times and using a more modern approach to creating assignments is essential in the 21st century classroom. 

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marknewton | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 7, 2009 at 1:15 PM (Answer #30)

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I agree with many prior posters!  Yes, some kids will be bored, and maybe there is nothing you can do about it.  They may be tired or unfocused.  But, for the most part, the important thing keeping kids engaged is that you must be engaging.  And for me the thing that engages kids in 8th grade history is not the subject matter, but the belief the kids have in you that you care about them and that they trust you.  Once kids know you care and trust you, boredom is easier to combat.  Due to the many "quick" electronic influences in kids' lives, there is probably a shorter attention span that is real.  To address this, we teachers need to design engaging lessons that differ almost every day.  Switch things up.  Move the seats, stand on chairs, use cooperative learning groups, journal and have them share, use technology, make movies, etc.  And interspersed with all these changes you can still meet curricular goals by sometimes using old stand bys.  There is still a place to lecture and to teach kids how to read effectively and to take good notes.  But, overall, kids want to know you care, are passionate about them and the subject you teach, and then they will give back to you over and over again.

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mirnaguirguis | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted October 9, 2009 at 3:08 PM (Answer #32)

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may because you are a boring teacher

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lmallary | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 13, 2009 at 4:54 PM (Answer #37)

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Students get bored in class usually because they are not engaged in the lesson.  In this generation, kids are constantly playing video games, texting, listening to music etc. ...always engaged in something! This is why it is so very important that we as teachers keep our students engaged with lots of interaction and hands on learning!

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mrmdkunkel | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 14, 2009 at 12:11 PM (Answer #39)

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may because you are a boring teacher

  I am sure that we can support our fellow teachers a little more than this, can't we?  Even if you are joking, a teacher that is really lloking for help may be offeneded at your statement.

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mrmdkunkel | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 14, 2009 at 12:13 PM (Answer #38)

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I agree with many of the posts that I have read.  Yes it is true that you need to engage students in any manner you can.  You also need to have them take wonership of their learning.  One of the most successful ways I have found to achieve this is to design lessons that include student collaboration. (you might even call this group learning).

You might even change things up and include centers or stations in your class.  You might also look at how you are delivering your lessons.  Are you always doing things the same way?  Do you strive to connect with all different types of learners? (oral, visual, kinestheitc, etc.)

Last thought, are you challenging all of your students?  I know from some of my previous years that all students aren't all on the same levels.  Maybe you need to have some more "enrichment" or even project based learning for your more advanced students.

Good luck.

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krocha | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 14, 2009 at 8:25 PM (Answer #40)

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Students need to move around.  No matter how old they get, many students get a lot out of moving around and learning through projects, simulations, and movement.  From 6th to 7th grade students have shared that school starts to "become boring" because in each class they have to sit in the classroom and take notes.  It's boring, dull, and many students are able to take the notes without actually understanding the concept that is being shared with them.

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jseiter | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 18, 2009 at 8:11 AM (Answer #44)

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Although I agree with parts of many of the previous comments (boredom, info overload, attention span, lack of creative lesson planning) as a general response, I believe the real answer may lie in the fact that our brain is NOT intended for storage of information, but the processing and solving of problems; storage or memory-based learning is inherently dull because we need connections to real problems.

Creative lesson strategies MUST relate to problems encountered by students, or be seen at least as relevent to their life.  This is extremely difficlut to accomplish daily, but I believe do-able over the course of weeks or months.

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missobot | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 18, 2009 at 10:56 AM (Answer #45)

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Indeed, students are bored in class because of a lack of engagement and based on the method of delivery of the lesson. What I have found out is that you have to bridge the gap of the lesson with something that they can be able to relate to their everyday life and or experiences. For instance, most students are prone to the computer, so I use technology as much in my classroom when relevant. Also, your classroom seating arrangements plays a role, since you would like everyone to be involved. Group work seemed more effective to me, once instructions and objectives are cleared,students' tend to work and interact much better than individually,teachers must be constantly be engaged with the class. "Notify your face "when students are bored! Ask yourself, "Am I passionate about what I'm doing"?

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geocas | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 19, 2009 at 11:27 AM (Answer #110)

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Collage=College? Time to use spell check.

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shemsham | High School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted December 29, 2009 at 12:05 PM (Answer #126)

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I noticed I misspelled differentiated instruction. #124

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crystaltu001 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted July 7, 2014 at 2:46 AM (Answer #167)

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Kids need to be engaged in class lessons and activities. There should be fun lessons and activities that make them move around. And do cool experiments and stuff

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jess1999 | TA , Grade 9 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted July 22, 2014 at 1:24 PM (Answer #168)

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For me as a student , the only reason I would be bored is because I've already know the lesson enough . Usually I don't really need the class to be engaging , but for it to be fun I like it when the teacher would tell jokes along the way .

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arrellbelle | Student, College Sophomore | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted July 28, 2014 at 4:26 PM (Answer #169)

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As a Sophomore in college right now, I can honestly say that I have been in classes where they did not interest me and teachers lose my attention. Thinking back, some of the reasons was how monotonous a teacher was, they did not try to change the pitch in the way they speak and they sounded as if they did not want to try teaching the subject. Other reasons is because the way they taught was very boring, there were no challenges, group involvement, or creative activities. 

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crystaltu001 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted August 14, 2014 at 7:00 PM (Answer #170)

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Sometimes in classes it is because the teachers do not really have fun activities to teach and that is why kids get really bored easily. Kids need to move around and be engaged into what they are learning in class.

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udonbutterfly | TA , College Freshman | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted August 15, 2014 at 7:06 AM (Answer #171)

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The most exciting classes that I have ever had I could tell that teacher loved teaching what they were discussing and it transferred over to the lessons always be well received. To me it is 50% teacher and 50% student. The teacher must make an effort to at least engage the class and not make it seem like the lesson plan is a requirement rather a learning experience. Then it is up to that student to equally be engaged as the teacher.

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nishu2766 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted August 18, 2014 at 10:51 AM (Answer #172)

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Students feel uninterested in the class because of many reasons together: 

1. They don't realise the importance of sstudies and how they are dependent on these classes to build up their future. 

2. They have varied interests and all are taught in the same way. 

3. We cannot blame students for not taking interest but develop the ways they take interest in by changing the same monotonous teaching every everyday. 

Most importantly they must have faith in their teacher, if they get into a belief that their teachers want to insult them, whole teaching procedure goes in vain. Teachers must show affection and care for them to keep them occupied and on the right track. 

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zumba96 | TA , Grade 11 | (Level 2) Valedictorian

Posted November 29, 2014 at 5:56 AM (Answer #174)

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Some students may believe that the coursework is too easy or the teacher is too lax. I know that some classes in my high school result in kids leaving off campus to get some food because it is an easy A class. But beside that, it is easy to go off campus since the teacher is very lax in that class and will not say anything if they are late. However, only very few teachers are like that at my school, but this is one of the reasons why a kid in school can get bored. If the whole class is distracted there is a very likely chance the kid will be distracted as well. 

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turnis7 | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 24, 2009 at 3:04 PM (Answer #72)

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kids need to move around and learn cool stuff

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