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Do you agree with Frye that we are often quick to “accept as fact something that we...

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torontoraptors | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 27, 2008 at 11:13 AM via web

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Do you agree with Frye that we are often quick to “accept as fact something that we know to be nonsense”?

Do you agree with Frye that we are often quick to “accept as fact something that we know to be nonsense”?

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timbrady | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted September 27, 2008 at 5:31 PM (Answer #2)

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This is what I think we used to call "the willing suspension of disbelief," and I suspect that we often accept something we know to be nonesense in the course of a story.  I used to read a lot of Tom Clancy; I often was amazed at the way he had things work out in the end :)  The same is true of a book like Dan Brown's "Angels and Demons" where one of the characters parachutes from a helicopter (I believe) with something on slightly larger than a handkerchief.  I also remember the television show "Qunicy."  It was about a coronor who could solve a case if he found a single hair from the guilty person's pet poodle.  

I don't know if this is a bad thing; and I think I would use a kinder word than "nonesense" which has a much more negative feeling than the "suspension of disbelief."

And you can always find another author.  I haven't read Clancy in a long time, and could never stand Quincy, so I moved on to other authors whose "nonesense" I find more palatable ... like J.A. Jance :)

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