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Do any teachers here teach that alcohol is a narcotic drug (that the AMA categorizes in...

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alcoholthenar... | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 9, 2008 at 1:49 PM via web

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Do any teachers here teach that alcohol is a narcotic drug (that the AMA categorizes in with heroin)?

See this site for more info:

www.alcoholthenarcotic.org

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pmiranda2857 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted July 10, 2008 at 1:22 PM (Answer #2)

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Alcohol is a depressant, therefore, when I teach Health to my students and we discuss the effects of alcohol on the body, I highlight the fact that after the initial "Lampshade on the table dance," the person falls flat into a slowed down state. Slurring their words, stumbling and, if they try to drive, being unable to steer and control a car, likely to crash. 

When I tell my students that Blackouts occur and the drinker has no memory of what occurs during this period, they are dumbfounded.   

Alcohol is a drug, inasmuch, because of its addictive quality and the fact that many people who drink also abuse drugs. 

Alcohol, seen as a harmless source of pleasure is actually a contributing factor to many deaths, through drunk driving and alcohol poisoning.

So, I can see why alcohol would be classified in the same category of heroin.  Both Alcohol and Heroin are psychologically addicting.      

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alcoholthenarcotic | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 11, 2008 at 1:19 PM (Answer #3)

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Alcohol is a depressant, therefore, when I teach Health to my students and we discuss the effects of alcohol on the body, I highlight the fact that after the initial "Lampshade on the table dance," the person falls flat into a slowed down state. Slurring their words, stumbling and, if they try to drive, being unable to steer and control a car, likely to crash. 

When I tell my students that Blackouts occur and the drinker has no memory of what occurs during this period, they are dumbfounded.   

Alcohol is a drug, inasmuch, because of its addictive quality and the fact that many people who drink also abuse drugs. 

Alcohol, seen as a harmless source of pleasure is actually a contributing factor to many deaths, through drunk driving and alcohol poisoning.

So, I can see why alcohol would be classified in the same category of heroin.  Both Alcohol and Heroin are psychologically addicting.      

This was moved here so other's can comment. (I had replied to pmiranda via personal Email) Now to add:

Not only are Alcohol and Heroin pyscholigically addicting but physically as well. The American Phy Assoc's Criteria handbook spells out that alcohol is more intoxicating and has more harsh withdrawal side-effects than alcohol. An arguement could be made that alcohol is worse...but this thread is for discussion is more about what we teach our kids about alcohol.

Society is so drunk on denial that we have allowed teen drinking to become epidemic (per the AMA) and are not teaching it with information that they can use to make better decisions...well, add that parents are not informed enough to address this either.

I welcome all to see a website that covers a lot of what I am saying.

www.alcoholthenarcotic.org

We need to try something different if we are going to reduce teen drinking...agreed?

Thank you.

 

 

 

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted June 15, 2010 at 1:12 PM (Answer #4)

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I agree with your stance and I do believe that more needs to be done to reduce teen drinking, but I am wondering if a distinction needs to be made between different types of substances that are addictive. For example, everybody knows that caffeine can be addictive and that it can effect us adversely in our health, and yet we do not preach against coffee drinking in our classes. Certainly "drugs" such as heroine seem to offer a far more addictive and dangerous problem that needs attention. I am not saying that we should not campaign against drinking, but at the same time is not our role as educators to allow our students to possess the information necessary to make informed choices?

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted June 29, 2010 at 8:36 AM (Answer #5)

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In my classroom we do discuss alcohol and other drugs as well. Alcohol is a depressant and we discuss that as well. Like the previous responder said, there are many different kinds of drugs and they have different effects on the body.

Teen drinking is a problem and it has been for decades. I think that it is important that children know exactly what alcohol does to the human body.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted October 22, 2010 at 3:35 AM (Answer #6)

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In our school, alcohol education needs to be more rigorous. Students know it's addictive, but not to them. They know it's damaging, but they're invincible. They know there are other consequences, but it's only illegal if you get caught. Besides in a small community, what else is there to do? We're not hurting anyone. Students need alcohol education that gives them a real wake up call, and I hope it occurs in the curriculum before they have to learn about it through the crash that kills classmates or the classmate who dies of alcohol poisoning.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted June 26, 2011 at 1:23 PM (Answer #7)

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I agree that there does not seem to be nearly enough drug education. My school teaches health one period a week. That is hardly time to get into everything needed. In most cases, alcohol is not taught as a drug at all. Usually, we teach students about "drugs and alcohol," in other words' they are too separate elements. I have never seen a school group it with heroine.
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alcoholthenarcotic | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 10, 2012 at 10:31 PM (Answer #8)

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Hi, I had lost track of this discussion...oops. You nailed it with "we teach students about "drugs and alcohol, in other words' they are too separate elements"...we know they are not, they are only separated by the severity of effects...alcohol is worse than crack or heroin.

We have so far to go huh? I am frustrated with this matter, met a few state senators about it, the gov and leading health professio...wait, make that "leading health bureaucrats" and they are totally MIA in accepting and acting on this. They pass laws here based on ideology not reality

The valid question really should be: How do we break the social norms to help reduce the cycle of addiction?

1. Sue the alcohol industry - make them stop advertising narcotics on TV and radio. Sue them for $60 billion a year (That's what it costs us in taxes per year from teen alcohol "accidents" alone.)

2. Require the FDA to force the alcohol industry to mark it's drug product with a Drug Facts Label...simple! Your toothpaste and baking soda has DFL...why not alcohol???

3. Have the CDC do PSA's telling urging parents to STOP doping their kids. (Half the alcohol kids get come from their own parents for free) Are they Crazy ot just ignorant.

Anyone have the nuggets to join forces and get this done? My org does not take money so this is JUST about prevention and breaking the back of this growing cycle of addiction. Numbers would help

Thanks..

 

 

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