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Discuss your opinion on the ending of Othello.Discuss your opinion on the ending of...

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iheartbrooms | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 10, 2011 at 8:46 PM via web

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Discuss your opinion on the ending of Othello.

Discuss your opinion on the ending of Othello.

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neondime | Student , Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted April 11, 2011 at 4:01 AM (Answer #2)

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Sorry, I'd love to help, but  I'm not Othello so I don't think you're asking me.

(PS: see "Commas [When] Addressing People" at the link below.)

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akannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 12, 2011 at 1:30 AM (Answer #3)

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The ending to the drama is a powerful one.  There is a combination of feelings felt.  On one hand, there is a level of extreme sadness that someone with so much has devolved into such a sad and pathetic state.  Othello had everything in his own possession.  It disintegrates due to his own feeling of insecurity and doubt.  These undermine his own faith in himself and those around him.  This is sad to witness. However, the ending is also a bit on the haunting side and actually proves to be a bit scary in terms of how individuals can deceive one another and how some allow themselves to be deceived.  Iago's manipulation and outright cruelty prevents the ending for me to be something of pure sadness.  There is a fearful note evident because so much of what happened was the result of Iago's manipulation and calculation.  In this light, the ending is quite ominous in discussing how individual cruelty can be destructive and undermine any hope of redemption or social solidarity.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 13, 2011 at 7:06 AM (Answer #4)

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I hate the ending to this, in fact, I hate the whole play.

I can take tragedies like Romeo and Juliet because it's more or less no one's fault that they both die.  But here, it's all Iago's fault (and to some extent Othello's for being so jealous and stupid).  The ending doesn't feel just.  It feels like Iago is getting away with his evil.  I suppose he will end up being killed, but we don't get to see it and I really want to see Iago killed for what he has done.

So, at the end, we don't get the feeling that good has overcome evil and the guilty will be punished.  This makes it an extremely emotionally unsatisfying ending.

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sarahc418 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

Posted April 22, 2011 at 6:22 PM (Answer #6)

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I actually love this play. I think Othello's tragic flaws are what drive him to die. It is not just Iago whispering in his ear that causes him to kill Desdemona because it doesn't make sense that someone would just jump to the conclusions that their wife is cheating on them without just proof. Othello's rage and quickness to judge Desdemona make me dislike his character and really only feel pity for Desdemona and Emilia in the end.

Iago is wholly a villain without redeeming qualities in the play - true evil. I am sure he will be sufficiently punished, but it is Othello who I feel most disappointed in because he is supposed to be a war hero who vows to love and protect Desdemona. I think his death in the end is justified and really shows that jealousy makes monsters of us all not just true villains.

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emelie23 | Student , Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted June 27, 2011 at 7:14 PM (Answer #7)

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His body, and that of Desdemona, are not carried off in state, but hurriedly hidden from view by the drawing of the curtain around the bed on which they lie, because the spectacle they offer is felt as something monstrous and obscene. Nothing is left to be settled and disposed of except the house and fortunes of the Moor, which pass in one brief clipped sentence to Gratiano, Desdemona’s next of kin. No interpretation of the events that have led up to the disaster is given, or even promised. Faced with actions which they find shocking and unintelligible, the surviving characters seek, with a haste that is almost indecent, to put them out of sight and out of mind. Their reaction is that of the normal ordinary man, and, as such, serves to underline for the last time the remoteness of Othello from those among whom he has lived and moved. The most immediately and impressively heroic of all the tragic heroes is granted no epic valediction from the mouths of others, no ceremonious rites of funeral; primarily, of course, because he has forfeited all claim to them through his crime in murdering Desdemona, but also, I think, because he is, and always has been, a mystery and a challenge to the unheroic world in which fate and circumstance have placed him.

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