In Animal Farm, discuss the significance of sugarcandy mountain to the animals' state of being on the farm.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Orwell uses Moses and Sugarcandy Mountain as a representation of how those in the position of power seek ways to divert the animals' minds from the struggle they endure. At the start of the narrative, Sugarcandy Mountain is significant because it prevents thoughts of rebellion from surfacing.  If animals can constantly be told that their struggles in this life lead to redemption on "Sugarcandy Mountain" in the next one, then Jones' leadership is intact and he can continue to abuse the animals.  Sugarcandy's Mountain is significant because it seeks to divert the animals' mind from asking why the current situation is constructed in the manner it is.  Its significance in the narrative is to symbolize how organized religion can be used by those in the position of power to keep people from asking the critical questions about their own state of being such as why things are the way they are and why there cannot be change.  In the narrative, Sugarcandy Mountain appears at the end of the novel, as the pigs tolerate Moses in order to use him as a diversion to ensure the animals do not ask the critical questions of why power is constructed in the manner it is and how there can be change.  It is here where I think that Sugarcandy Mountain is shown to have its greatest significance in the life of the animals in Animal Farm.


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