Discuss the ending of The Cay?  Are you satisfied with the author's point of view? Why?

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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The ending of the Theodore Taylor novel, The Cay, is certainly a hopeful one. Despite the death of Timothy, his life has served as an example for Phillip, who has spent most of his young life wary of black men. Phillip grows to respect and love Timothy, and he manages to survive alone on the cay without him thanks to the lessons he has learned. It becomes a happy ending in more ways than one: Phillip is rescued, and he regains his sight after several operations. Through his experiences with Timothy, he also has a new love of both geography and the black natives of Curacao. He yearns to spend more time with them and learn about their lives, and in so doing, he occasionally meets people who knew Timothy. In this way, Timothy's memory is kept alive and well. 

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

In the book The Cay, Timothy and Phillip have been stranded on an island by themselves with very few supplies.  Phillip and Timothy are very different people.  Timothy is an older black man and Phillip is a young white boy. 

Phillip was blinded when he was hit in the head after a torpedo wrecked the boat he and his mother were on heading towards America after the German subs were located off the Island where he had lived.

On the island the two are faced with a terrible storm and Timothy survives but is weakened from protecting the boy during the storm.  After setting up a coral guide for Phillip to follow to the sea, Timothy dies.  Timothy is sad and buries his friend who had helped him.

Philip is later rescued and returns to the island where he finds his mother has lived and he returns to live wth his dad.  The author takes the point of view of Phillip looking back on the events that ahd happened and is now finding hat he is too mature after the experience to enjoy the things other boys his age are enjoying.

The author's point of view is the way that a young boy who had been through a trauma would behave.  He would be sad but also have grown up significantly from the event and have trouble relating to children his age who had not been through a similar trauma.

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