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Describe what you hear in the patterns of Mozart’s music that might improve mental...

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nakeisha13 | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted February 3, 2013 at 4:08 PM via web

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Describe what you hear in the patterns of Mozart’s music that might improve mental acuity.

 

Supposedly, listening to Mozart can raise your intelligence, which is why the “Baby Mozart” CD for infants has been a best-seller. Listen to the first movement of Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 on the class CD and describe what you hear in the patterns of Mozart’s music that might improve mental acuity.

 

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akannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 4, 2013 at 11:55 AM (Answer #1)

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The "Mozart Effect" was something generated out of research published in Nature 1993.  The researchers found that a specific amount of time listening to Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major, K 448 resulted in an increase in spatial reasoning skills in abstract tasks.  In terms of what is in the musical composition that could explain this, I would suggest that the intricacy of the piano work in the piece might be a part of this equation.  In seeking to fully comprehend the nuanced nature of the piano part in the Sonata, one recognizes a complex arrangement as well as layers upon layers of musical composition.  This construction helps the mind to focus on different parts of the song, perhaps enabling it to grasp with greater skill abstract reasoning, something that the song already evokes.  

At the same time, I would suggest that the arrangement of the song as one in which each note is fundamentally dependent on the other is a traditional Mozart element.  The idea of each note serving musical purpose and connecting to the next one helps to enhance the development of the song and its breakdown is one in which one can see why mental acuity would increase in the study as a result.

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