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Describe the life Mrs. Wright of Trifles might have lived as a singer?

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lovestinks | Salutatorian

Posted April 2, 2013 at 3:19 AM via web

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Describe the life Mrs. Wright of Trifles might have lived as a singer?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 2, 2013 at 4:45 AM (Answer #1)

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For a character who is not present in the drama, Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters act as the voice of Minnie Wright. From Mrs. Hale, especially, the reader learns that Mrs. Wright, formerly Minnie Foster, was in the church choir and enjoyed singing. As the wives of another farmer and the sherriff, Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters sit in the kitchen of the Wright house, where they discover the little songbird with its neck broken, a bird who represents Mrs. Wright, whose voice also has been stopped all these years as a farmer's wife.  Truly, she has been suppressed, made to cook and clean and serve "a hard man" in a most "lonesome place" miles from other places.

Mrs. Hale describes Mrs. Wright as 

"...kind of like a bird herself--real sweet and pretty, but kind of timid and--fluttery.  How--she--did--change."

Just as in death, Mrs. Wright has no voice in her life with John Wright. And, when the bird dies, Mrs. Wright, who has already lost her will to sing, surely feels that all beauty in her life has died.

MRS. HALE   "...I wish you'd see Minnie Foster when she wore a white dress with blue ribbons and strolled up there in the choir and sang."

Clearly, Mrs. Wright has been a different person in her youth; having later lived an isolated life with an insensitive and distant husband causes Minnie to become bereft of joy in her alienation. It is only the little songbird that brings the recluse joy.

Had Minnie Wright not married, but become a singer instead of a lonely farmwife, she may have felt fulfilled and had a heart of joy, for music, as do other fine arts, feeds the soul. In a sort of reversed pathetic fallacy, then, when the little bird as a emissary of her own soul dies, it is as though life has ended for Minnie Wright. Perceiving Mr. Wright, the "hard man," as her executioner, she, then, retaliates against him, murdering him because he has killed her voice with which she could have lived a rich life.   

 

 

 

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