Homework Help

describe the emperor's palace  

user profile pic

jishajijumon | eNotes Newbie

Posted June 2, 2013 at 3:54 PM via web

dislike 0 like

describe the emperor's palace

 

1 Answer | Add Yours

user profile pic

caitlinjoseph10 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted June 27, 2013 at 9:00 PM (Answer #1)

dislike 0 like

Here is the description in a direction quotation from the novel.  This can be found in part one, chapter four:

"The emperor’s palace is in the centre of the city where the two great streets meet. It is enclosed by a wall of two feet high, and twenty feet distance from the buildings. I had his majesty’s permission to step over this wall; and, the space being so wide between that and the palace, I could easily view it on every side.

The outward court is a square of forty feet, and includes two other courts: in the inmost are the royal apartments, which I was very desirous to see, but found it extremely difficult; for the great gates, from one square into another, were but eighteen inches high, and seven inches wide. Now the buildings of the outer court were at least five feet high, and it was impossible for me to stride over them without infinite damage to the pile, though the walls were strongly built of hewn stone, and four inches thick."

Some things I notice from the passage are:

-The palace is the center, surrounded (or protected) by the city.  It is the heart of the city.

-It is heavily protected by gates, stones and high walls.

"The people having received notice a second time, I went again through the city to the palace, with my two stools in my hands. When I came to the side of the outer court, I stood upon one stool, and took the other in my hand; this I lifted over the roof, and gently set it down on the space between the first and second court, which was eight feet wide. I then stept over the building very conveniently, from one stool to the other, and drew up the first after me with a hooked stick. By this contrivance I got into the inmost court; and, lying down upon my side, I applied my face to the windows of the middle stories, which were left open on purpose, and discovered the most splendid apartments that can be imagined. There I saw the empress and the young princes in their several lodgings, with their chief attendants about them."

-Gulliver, with the Emperor's permission, also temporarily removes the roof to peek inside the palace.

-He views the inside by standing on a few stools he crafted from trees near the city.

Sources:

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes