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What is the definition of prose? Kinds of prose, element of prose, characteristics of...

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raindrop07 | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted August 18, 2010 at 2:42 AM via web

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What is the definition of prose? Kinds of prose, element of prose, characteristics of prose?

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 18, 2010 at 4:36 AM (Answer #1)

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Prose refers simply to any written piece of work that is built on sentences (and paragraphs) rather than lines or verses (like poetry).

Examples/kinds of prose include novels, short stories, essays, letters, editorials, articles, and journals.

Characteristics of prose can be broken into four categories, divided by purpose:

  1. Narrative: writing which tells a story (can be fiction or non-fiction); usually told in chronological order; has characters; follows the basic plot-line - exposition, rising action, climax, falling action.
  2. Expository: gives basic information; used often in speeches and essays; does not tell a story or argue.
  3. Descriptive: describes something in detail, again without telling a story or arguing a point; used most often in combination with another mode of writing, but alone is often found in scientific or medical reports.
  4. Persuasive: argues a point (or two sides of a question); gives evidence in favor or against.

To explain prose as simply as possible, it covers anything written that is NOT poetry - basically.

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theyellowbookworm | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted November 23, 2014 at 2:32 PM (Answer #2)

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Prose connotes spoken or written discourse that is not patterned into metric or free verse. To put it simply, prose is writing or speech that is not poetry.

Prose exists on a variety of different levels. For instance, at one end of the spectrum is ordinary, colloquial speech. In contrast, at the other end is distinguished written discourse, or what John Dryden called “that other harmony of prose.”

There are a variety of different types of prose. These include:

  1. Nonfictional Prose: A piece of writing based on fact. Examples include autobiographies, biographies, and non-fiction essays.
  2. Fictional Prose: Imaginative writing. Examples include novels, parables, short stories, and most drama.
  3. Heroic Prose: Writing based on the formulaic expressions found in oral tradition. Examples include legends and fables.

Additionally, prose can be narrative, expository, descriptive or persuasive. Narrative writing has a storyline and characters. It is often told chronologically. Expository writing denotes writing to explain. This form of writing explores particular topics and themes. Expository writing differs from narrative writing because it does not necessarily tell a story. Descriptive writing uses detail, such as the five senses, to discuss a topic in depth. This form of writing is often used in conjunction with narrative, expository, or persuasive writing. Persuasive writing attempts to convince the audience of the merits or disadvantages of the topic.

The term “prose” originates from the Latin prosa, meaning "in phrase" which was derived from prosa oratio, meaning "straight, direct, unadorned speech." This phrase was derived from prorsus, meaning "straightforward or direct" and can be further traced to pro versusm, meaning "turned forward."

It is also known that artfully written prose seems to have developed later than written verse (poetry). Inherent in prose is a sense of style, or how speakers and writers communicate their meanings. Prose style is specific to a particular work, author, or genre.

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