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Countee Cullen's influence on the Harlem ReniassanceWhat was Countee Cullen's influence...

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ll8 | Student, Grade 11

Posted December 16, 2007 at 5:17 PM via web

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Countee Cullen's influence on the Harlem Reniassance

What was Countee Cullen's influence on the Harlem Reniassance?

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted December 16, 2007 at 5:56 PM (Answer #2)

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The Harlem Renaissance was a powerful movement in art, literature and music in the 1920's.  It had its roots in Harlem, NY, and it marked great achievements of African-Americans in this discipline.  Jazz saw its beginnings in this time, and provocative poetry and prose helped to identify and develop the dynamic culture of African-American community.  Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Duke Ellington are just a few of the names associated with this period.

Countee Cullen was the author of "Color", a 1925 book of poetry that established itself both as a expression of the times, as well as an expression of racial controversy.  The lyrics challenged the traditions of poetry with their sensuous nature.  Critics hailed the book, and Cullen's success helped to promote the work of his fellow African-American writers.

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sagetrieb | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted December 19, 2007 at 4:27 AM (Answer #3)

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Besides addressing issues of race, in terms of the beauty of being black the one hand and the effects of racism on the ohter, Cullen also contributed to the Harlem Renaissance a sense of poetry as a tradition. That is, although his topics were often controversial, he wrote many of his poems in the form of the Shakespearean sonnet, and critics often discuss the influence of English Romantic poets, such as William Wordsworth and William Blake on his verse.  In this way, he brought a legitimacy to the Harlem Renaissance, providing it a piece of white culture, which he converted to his own radical use. His sonnet "The Black Christ," for example, which is written in a traditional sonnet form, usually reserved for topics of love or other elevated ideas, compares a black man who is lynched, hanging from a tree, to Christ: this mixture of irreverence toward and celebration of tradition provided a unique tone to the literature of the Harlem Renaissance.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 10, 2012 at 5:23 AM (Answer #4)

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The author of many poems dealing with the conditions of the Negro, Countee Cullen was criticized by many of his contemporaries for his adherence to traditional form in his poetry; they felt that this form was not appropriate for the expression of the racial issues.  Nevertheless, his figurative language and sonnet forms express an emotionalism that is felt by readers. Langston Hughes stated that Cullen's "The Black Christ" was the greatest poem he ever read.

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bedie-yo | Student, Grade 10

Posted April 4, 2013 at 8:09 PM (Answer #5)

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The Harlem Renaissance was a powerful movement in art, literature and music in the 1920's.  It had its roots in Harlem, NY, and it marked great achievements of African-Americans in this discipline.  Jazz saw its beginnings in this time, and provocative poetry and prose helped to identify and develop the dynamic culture of African-American community.  Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Duke Ellington are just a few of the names associated with this period.

Countee Cullen was the author of "Color", a 1925 book of poetry that established itself both as a expression of the times, as well as an expression of racial controversy.  The lyrics challenged the traditions of poetry with their sensuous nature.  Critics hailed the book, and Cullen's success helped to promote the work of his fellow African-American writers.

what di you mean when you said "critics hailed the book"?

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