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Could you please tell me what is a "weather man" and a "patron" in the following...

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coutelle | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted May 1, 2013 at 1:10 PM via web

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Could you please tell me what is a "weather man" and a "patron" in the following excerpt from the chapter 5 of The Great Gatsby. Does "weather man" refer to drawings used in newspaper weather forecasts, in which a smiling face indicated good weather, and "patron" a patron saint?

“Has it?” When he realized what I was talking about, that there were twinkle-bells of sunshine in the room, he smiled like a weather man, like an ecstatic patron of recurrent light, and repeated the news to Daisy. “What do you think of that? It’s stopped raining.”

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 2, 2013 at 2:58 AM (Answer #1)

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Fitzgerald is using two different similes to describe Gatsby's actions and feelings at this time when he is finally reunited with Daisy. 

First, he compares Gatsby with the person who has to deliver weather forecasts predicting rainy weather, which is frequently not a welcome forecast. When the rain stops, the weather man is able to smile again as he predicts sunny weather returning.

Secondly, Fitzgerald uses the word "patron" as talking about someone who is a regular customer of a particular item. In this case, he is describing Gatsby as becoming as excited about the "twinkle-bells of sunshine in the room" as would someone who likes to buy light that can come back frequently - "recurrent light."

 

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