Homework Help

Could you please tell me the meaning of "what he's got" in the following passage from...

user profile pic

coutelle | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted May 8, 2013 at 12:10 AM via web

dislike 2 like

Could you please tell me the meaning of "what he's got" in the following passage from the last chapter of The Great Gatsby

"Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something. Do you notice what he's got about improving his mind? He was always great for that. He told me I et like a hog once and I beat him for it."

1 Answer | Add Yours

Top Answer

user profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 8, 2013 at 12:40 AM (Answer #1)

dislike -1 like

Henry C. Gatz, Gatsby's father, is remembering Jimmy Gatz, the son he had known many years before, and is trying to help Nick to know the boy he was remembering.

The self-improvement schedule that Mr. Gatz has shown Nick is, in Mr. Gatz's opinion, an illustration of how determined Jimmy had been to improve himself. Earlier, Mr. Gatz had told Nick, "He knew he had a big future in front of him." Mr. Gatz uses the expression "what he's got" as his personal, non-educated way of stating that Jimmy was steadfast and commited to making himself into a better, more educated, more refined, more successful man. Mr. Gatz's lack of verbal refinement is further reflected in his remark, "He told me I et (instead of 'ate') like a hog once, and I beat him for it."

Sources:

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes