Could you please tell me the meaning of "her wit rose faintly" in the following excerpt from the chapter Seven of The Great Gatsby? “It’s so hot,” she complained. “You go. We’ll ride...

Could you please tell me the meaning of "her wit rose faintly" in the following excerpt from the chapter Seven of The Great Gatsby?

“It’s so hot,” she complained. “You go. We’ll ride around and meet you after.” With an effort her wit rose faintly, “We’ll meet you on some corner. I’ll be the man smoking two cigarettes.”

Asked on

1 Answer | Add Yours

Top Answer

michael-niagara's profile pic

Posted on

The meaning of "her wit rose faintly" is that Daisy is succumbing to the hot weather and finding it difficult to maintain an air of grace and positivity. She's trying to not be negative and morose sounding so she makes an attempt at injecting humor into the situation. It's a forced attempt at levity, which is why her wit, or wittiness "rose faintly". It is barely perceptible; it is not a heartfelt, no-holds-barred, flamboyant wit. Rather her feeble attempt at wit here belies her true state of mind and feelings. To the reader, Daisy seems unsatisfied, restless, and she also seems to be scurrying about because of some underlying dissatisfaction in her life.

Sources:

We’ve answered 327,796 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question