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Could you give me the correct citation in MLA format for information I quoted from...

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mavarady | (Level 1) Honors

Posted July 15, 2013 at 12:05 AM via web

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Could you give me the correct citation in MLA format for information I quoted from biography.com? The article accessed was for Suzanne Collins' biography information listed on the bio. true story page, accessed on 6 July 2013.

I pasted this directly from my browser, so I hope it works.

 

http://www.biography.com/people/suzanne-collins-20903551?page=1

 

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noahvox2 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted July 15, 2013 at 6:06 PM (Answer #1)

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Creating citations these days is a minefield, especially if one is using internet resources. Some internet sites anticipate these issues and actually have a button or link that the user can click on and which will format the article's citation in a variety of formats.

Ordinarily, with an article from a website, MLA wants the author's name (last name first, first name last), the title of the article in quotation marks and with a period inside the right quotation mark set, the name of the website (in italics or underlined) followed by a period, the date (day month year) of publication followed by a period, the word "Web" followed by a period, the date (day month year) you accessed the article followed by a period.

In the case of this article about Suzanne Collins, no author is given, so the entry should start with the article title.

"Suzanne Collins."

The page indicates that the article was published in 2013.

The article was published by The Biography Channel website and I'm accessing the article on 15 July 2013.

According to the Purdue University Online Writing Lab, MLA no longer requires the URL.

Thus, the entry should look something like this:

"Suzanne Collins." The Biography Channel website. 2013. Web. 15 July 2013.

Please keep in mind that lines two and following of an MLA citation should be indented one-half inch (usually one tab).

 

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