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Contrast Banquo's and Macbeth's reaction to  the witches in Act 1.

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kdp123 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 1, 2007 at 9:27 AM via web

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Contrast Banquo's and Macbeth's reaction to  the witches in Act 1.

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mrerick | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted November 1, 2007 at 9:37 AM (Answer #1)

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Macbeth lets ambition corrupt him immediately upon learning that he has become the new Thane of Cawdor.  The fact that one of the witches' prophecies comes true makes him hungry for the rest.  His lines:

"Glamis, and Thane of Cawdor! The greatest is behind."

He then questions Banquo about those prophecies for his children.  Macbeth assumes that since he is excited about potentially becoming king, Banquo must be excited about his line becoming kings.  Banquo, however, is very distrusting of the witches' because they are evil beings.  He won't put much stock into what they have said just yet because he's concerned about the reprecussions.  His lines:

"And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,the instruments of darkness tell us truths, Win us with honest trifles, to betray's in deepest consequence."

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted November 1, 2007 at 11:21 AM (Answer #2)

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Check out some of eNotes' information at the following links.  Good luck!

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 1, 2007 at 12:06 PM (Answer #3)

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What is interesting to note, however, is that Macbeth's reaction grows based upon the "reality" of what the witches are telling him.  Banquo remains skeptical - and fairly so - his prediction seems unrealistic.  When more of Macbeth's predictions come true, in Act II, Banquo starts to re-examine and to have some hope for himself.  This implies that all men are subject to influence.

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 1, 2007 at 12:06 PM (Answer #4)

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What is interesting to note, however, is that Macbeth's reaction grows based upon the "reality" of what the witches are telling him.  Banquo remains skeptical - and fairly so - his prediction seems unrealistic.  When more of Macbeth's predictions come true, in Act II, Banquo starts to re-examine and to have some hope for himself.  This implies that all men are subject to influence.

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 1, 2007 at 12:07 PM (Answer #5)

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What is interesting to note, however, is that Macbeth's reaction grows based upon the "reality" of what the witches are telling him.  Banquo remains skeptical - and fairly so - his prediction seems unrealistic.  When more of Macbeth's predictions come true, in Act II, Banquo starts to re-examine and to have some hope for himself.  This implies that all men are subject to influence.

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