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Choosing a career: in your opinion, what do you think of Career Teachers who would...

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meowththth | Student | eNoter

Posted May 11, 2012 at 9:45 PM via web

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Choosing a career: in your opinion, what do you think of Career Teachers who would give neutral/non-biased advice to help the students choosing their careers? Explain why.

Choosing a career: in your opinion, what do you think of Career Teachers who would give neutral/non-biased advice to help the students choosing their careers? Explain why.

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted April 20, 2012 at 2:30 PM (Answer #2)

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This is one of the best questions I have ever seen on eNotes! I wish I had more expertise to offer in my answer. The choice of a career is the most important choice a person can make in his or her entire life, and it is especially important for young people because the way they get started often determines what they will be doing until they are ready to retire. School have counselors to advise students in choosing their majors and in other such academic matters; but I don't believe that the public school system offers enough help in choosing careers. At best they have counselors who can tell students what fields offer opportunities because of a growing demand for labor; but just because there are opportunities in a particular field doesn't mean that a student is psychologically suited to work in that field. And I think there are a great many people in the working world who are square pegs in round holes or round pegs in square holes. Your idea of Career Teachers is an excellent one! I think the schools are moving slowly in that direction, but the movement is glacial, partly because of lack of funding. They could have entire courses in high school devoted to psychological self-assessment, career choice, as well as career opportunities. Maybe they already do, but I don't think there are many.  You use the words "neutral/non-biased advice." I think that is wise, because outside interests try to exert influence to have intelligent young people guided towards their employment offices. In the meantime an intelligent student, like yourself, can and should do a lot of private soul-searching and can find a lot of information about career decisions and psychological self-assessment in books and on the Internet.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 11, 2012 at 10:22 PM (Answer #3)

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I would think that this would be difficult for a teacher to do.  After all, everything we say is affected by our biases.  For example, I do not think that "poet" would be a very viable career path.  I would try to steer any student who expressed a desire to make a living as a poet away from that idea.  Is that bias?  So I question if such teachers exist.

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 13, 2012 at 8:06 AM (Answer #4)

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I would say a teacher is a great person to look to for career advice.  Teachers work with students daily and understand their cognition better than most people.  Obviously some bias would have to be overcome, but that would be the case with any adult who has a profession.  The best advice I could give is seek out multiple opinions, research careers you are interested in yourself, and really weigh everything.  Once you have made a decision, look for work that is related to your choice to see if you enjoy it.  If you want to be a doctor, volunteer at a hospital.  I think you will find most people very open to discuss their profession with a young person enthusiastic about sharing their career path.

Kristen Lentz

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