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childhood vs. adult world/ coming of ageidentify specific moments when the kids grow...

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nikkiboo15 | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 11, 2010 at 5:55 AM via web

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childhood vs. adult world/ coming of age

identify specific moments when the kids grow aware of the differences between childhood and the adult world

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mstultz72 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted April 11, 2010 at 6:12 AM (Answer #1)

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The book is set up in terms of contrasting themes, motifs, symbols, settings, and character foils, favoring childhood innocence and experience than adult status quo.  Here are some matchups

THEME

CHILDHOOD INNOCENCE VS. ADULT EXPERIENCE

RACIAL/CLASS EQUALITY VS. RACIAL/CLASS PREJUDICE

EDUCATION VS. IGNORANCE/SUPERSTITION

PROGRESS VS. TRADITION

COURAGE VS. COWARDICE

EARLY 0FEMINISM (TOMBOY) VS. SOUTHERN BELLE ("LADY-LIKE") ATTITUDES

CHARACTER

MAN VS. SOCIETY

BOO VS. FEARFUL SOCIETY

ROBINSONS VS. WHITE SOCIETY

ATTICUS VS. WHITE JURY

MAN VS. MAN

YOUNG (JEM, SCOUT, DILL) VS. OLD (ATTICUS, BOB)

ATTICUS VS. BOB EWELL

MOCKINGBIRDS (BOO/TOM) VS. BLUEJAYS (BOB/MOB)

SCOUT VS. TEACHERS, AUNT ALEXANDRA

SETTING

SUMMER (DILL) VS. FALL (HALLOWEEN)

TOWN (FINCHES) VS. COUNTRY (EWELLS)

FINCH HOUSE VS. RADLEY PLACE

COURTHOUSE / JAIL VS. OLD SARUM/LYNCH MOB

COLORED BALCONY VS. WHITE JURY

FIRST PURCHASE CHURCH VS. MISSONARY SOCIETY

SYMBOLS / MOTIFS / IMAGES

WHITE / LIGHT / FIRE VS. BLACK / DARK / GOTHIC

MOCKINGBIRDS (BOO/TOM) VS. BLUEJAYS (BOB/MOB/JURY)

RABID DOG (TIM JOHNSON) VS. GREY GHOST (BOO)

CHILDHOOD GAMES (BOO GAME) VS. CARNIVAL (TRIAL)

SYMPATHY VS. INSTITUTIONAL RACISM

("WHITE PRIVILEDGE")

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lfawley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted April 12, 2010 at 8:42 AM (Answer #2)

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A few moments that instantly spring to my mind include the scene in the courthouse when the children see first hand that adults lie, that adults define the world in black and white (racism), and that even in a court of law things are not always fair. Scout and Jem see Calpurnia as a nanny, a mother figure. They see nothing wrong with going to church with her. They do not see race. Scout sees it, as well, at school when she the teacher tells her that her father is not teaching her to read the right way. Scout is a mature soul in a child's body in many respects. Perhaps the most poignant moment occurs, however, at the end when, in childlike simplicity and grace, Scout takes Boo's hand and leads him home. The adult world has made Boo a monster because if his differences. Scout, in her child's vision, sees past all of this to see the child inside of Boo who is afraid of the dark, afraid of the world, has many of the same fears that she has.

The novel is a reflection. It is an adult looking back at her childhood, reminiscing, so the contrasts between child and adult thinking are very clear. The hope is that the reader walks away appreciating some of the great wisdom of youth that has not yet become jaded by the adult world.

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