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How are death and fate personified in Chapter 1 of A Tale of Two Cities?

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auzzie123 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted March 7, 2010 at 8:23 AM via web

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How are death and fate personified in Chapter 1 of A Tale of Two Cities?

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Michelle Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 7, 2010 at 9:36 AM (Answer #1)

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Fate is personified as a Woodman, or wood worker who would basically saw out the future of the people among the "woods" of weariness that are forming particularly in  French society.

It is likely enough that, rooted in the woods of France and Norway, there were growing trees, when that sufferer was put to death, already marked by the Woodman, Fate, to come down and be sawn into boards, to make a certain movable framework with a sack and a knife in it, terrible in history.

Death is personified as a Farmer which is basically raising the future victims of the French Revolution.

It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrels of the Revolution.

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