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In chapter 5, of The Great Gatsby, why does Daisy "cry stormily" over Gatsby's shirts?

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jabby32 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 11, 2012 at 12:02 AM via web

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In chapter 5, of The Great Gatsby, why does Daisy "cry stormily" over Gatsby's shirts?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 11, 2012 at 3:03 AM (Answer #1)

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When Daisy and Gatsby tour his house, dressed in the colors of wealth, silver and gold, they wander through "Marie Antoinette music rooms" and "Restoration salons." With a voice that "sounds like money," Daisy, who accepted the marriage proposal of Tom Buchanan, who offered her an extravagant necklace, is the "material girl" of the Jazz Age.  With maudlin sentimentality, Daisy buries her face in the many-colored shirts and begins "to cry stormily."

"They're such beautiful shirts," she sobbed, her voice muffled in the thick folds. "It makes me sad because I've never seen such--such beautiful shirts before."

Again, Daisy is impressed with Gatsby's wealth just as she was impressed with Tom's necklace.  Later, in her shallow dreaminess, Daisy wants to capture a pink cloud and put Gatsby into it and "push you around." Daisy's behavior in this chapter exemplifies her shallowness in being overcome by that with does not merit such emotion, and, further, it foreshadows the love of materialism that will restrain her from admitting her crime and preventing Gatsby from being implicated in the tragic death of Myrtle Wilson.

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