Homework Help

In chapters 5-6 of "Lord of the Flies," what does Simon mean when he says the...

user profile pic

heygirlhey | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 15, 2008 at 11:50 AM via web

dislike 1 like

In chapters 5-6 of "Lord of the Flies," what does Simon mean when he says the "beast" may be the boys themselves?

2 Answers | Add Yours

user profile pic

podunc | College Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted April 15, 2008 at 6:43 PM (Answer #1)

dislike 0 like

The most mystical and mysterious figure among the boys, Simon alone has a vague sense of the moral and spiritual conflict that has gripped them during their stay on the island. In chapter five, he suggests that "maybe there is a beast" but, also, that "maybe it's only us." Simon understands that it is not an outside evil but rather the outgrowth of "mankind's essential illness" that is destroying the group from within.

Sources:

user profile pic

simonsays | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 29, 2008 at 6:19 AM (Answer #2)

dislike 0 like

In chapter 5 and 6 Simon realizes that "the beast" represents the manifestation of evil that is accumulating within them. Therefore they arn't scared of the beast, but themselves, and what they will become.

 This is further proved by the Lord of the Flies on page 158 when it says: "Fancy thinking the beast was something you could hunt and kill! You knew didn't you? I'm part of you? Close, close, close! Im the reason why its a no go? Why things are what they are?"

 

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes