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In chapter 34 of Great Expectations, what is the narrator's attitude toward this club?

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lewisrip15 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted May 13, 2013 at 9:10 PM via web

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In chapter 34 of Great Expectations, what is the narrator's attitude toward this club?

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 13, 2013 at 9:38 PM (Answer #1)

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Pip does not think much of his club.  He does not see the point of it, and does not get much good out of it.

Pip notes that he never really understood the purpose of the club.

At Startop's suggestion, we put ourselves down for election into a club called the Finches of the Grove: the object of which institution I have never divined … (ch 34)

It seems to Pip that the members of the club are a bad influence on him.  All they seem to do is “dine expensively once a fortnight” and argue.  Pip notes that the club members “spent their money foolishly” and did not amass any good will—just a lot of debt.  While Pip has plenty of money (Magwitch's money), Herbert does not.

Pip's attitude toward his club is an example of how he is not really sure how to act now that he is rich.  He says he is growing accustomed to his expectations, but really all he is learning is bad habits of the supposedly rich, and no good ones.

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