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In chapter three of Lord of the Flies by William Golding, the metaphor in the sentence...

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LivingFiction | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 23, 2013 at 12:30 AM via web

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In chapter three of Lord of the Flies by William Golding, the metaphor in the sentence "They walked along, two continents of experience and feeling, unable to communicate" is used to do which of the following:

a. Emphasize the extent of the division between Ralph and Jack

b. Demonstrate the depth of Ralph's and Jacks's friendship

c. Reveal the incongruity of Ralph's and Jack's friendship

d. Stress the boys' dependence on emotions rather than words

e. Highlight the boys' mutual feelings

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 23, 2013 at 2:00 AM (Answer #1)

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Jack and Ralph are two of the main characters of William Golding's Lord of the Flies, and their goals for the island are worlds apart--or at least continents apart. Ralph is concerned with building shelters and keeping a signal fire lit in case a ship passes by and they can be rescued; Jack is obsessed with hunting and getting meat.

As two of the older boys, they become the two leaders on the island, and their differences become more apparent as the novel progresses. In chapter three, Ralph and Jack are talking at the end of a typical day: Ralph spent his day working on shelters virtually alone, and Jack spent the day hunting, virtually alone. Their conversation is not ugly or awful, but it is clear that they do not think alike and certainly they do not understand one other. Golding describes their rift this way:

“But the sun’s nearly set!”

“I might have time—-”

They walked along, two continents of experience and feeling, unable to communicate.

“If I could only get a pig!”

“I’ll come back and go on with the shelter.”

The two lines before the metaphor in your question has Ralph worrying about the sun setting without enough shelters finished and Jack hoping he has enough time to do a little more hunting. After the metaphor, Jack continues thinking about hunting and Ralph worries about the shelters. They have not communicated in any way.

The metaphor of two continents, equal but disconnected, "emphasize[s] the extent of the division between Ralph and Jack." 

Sources:

Lori Steinbach

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