In Chapter 3 of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch tells Scout that "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view ... until you climb...

In Chapter 3 of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch tells Scout that "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view ... until you climb in his skin and walk around in it." What are some things Scout begins to realize?


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In Chapter 3 of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch tells Scout that "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view ... until you climb in his skin and walk around in it." Atticus tells Scout that she has now begun to come to various realizations, including the following:

  • that her teacher, Miss Caroline, had made an honest mistake in dealing with her students earlier in the day.
  • that Scout and the other students could not expect Miss Caroline

to learn all of Maycomb’s ways in one day, and we could not hold her responsible when she knew no better.

In addition, Scout learns some other lessons from her conversation with her father in Chapter 3. Such lessons include the following:

  • that poverty is part of the explanation of the irresponsible behavior of the Ewell family.
  • that the Ewells have little real desire to be educated and that because of this lack of desire, which has persisted for generations, it would be “silly” to force them to attend school.
  • that the Ewells are people who behave like animals.
  • that Scout is not an exceptional case, as the Ewells are, and that Scout must therefore go to school even though the Ewell children do not.
  • that children should not suffer because they have irresponsible parents.
  • that some people will never change their ways.
  • that compromise can sometimes be a satisfying solution to a problem.

 

 

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