In chapter 25 of "The Kite Runner", I need to know the importance of this passage.Page 391"I ran. A grown man running with a swarm of screaming children. But I didn’t care. I ran...

In chapter 25 of "The Kite Runner", I need to know the importance of this passage.

Page 391

"I ran. A grown man running with a swarm of screaming children. But I didn’t care. I ran with the wind blowing in my face, and a smile as wide as the Valley of Panjsher on my lips. I ran."

I need why this is important element of novel.

I NEED IT BY TONIGHT PLEASE HELP ME.

Asked on by jacoboo

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ladyvols1 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

"Amir remembers flying kites with his father and Hassan in the wintertime. When their kite cuts down a competitor's kite, Amir runs to retrieve the fallen kite for Sohrab, echoing the words of Hassan from decades before: "For you a thousand times over."'

Amir is raising the son of his "servant," Hassan.  He is now serving Hassan in the only means he has left.  The quote at the end of the book is important because Amir finally feels that he has been redeemed from the terrible guilt he has carried all those years.  By becoming the "runner" for Sohrab, he is also "running" for Hassan.  The concept of flying kites is that it is child's play.  In many ways Amir is back to his childhood, only this time he is serving not being served.

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