In chapter 12 of Lord of the Flies, what two options did Ralph think he had to escape?

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mrerick | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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He actually entertains three possibly escapes.  He thinks about climbing a tree, which he dismisses because it's "putting all his eyes in one basket".  Then, he thinks about breaking through their attack line like a boar.  He decides against this because he realizes they will just turn around and continue stalking him.  Finally, he thinks about trying to hide as well as possible and hoping they pass right by him.  This is what he decides to do, which of course doesn't work because of the fire they start to flush him out.

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lsumner | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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In chapter 12 of Lord of the Flies, Ralph is fleeing for his life. He is not sure which is the best plan for escape from Jack and the savage hunters. Ralph approaches the empty shelters that he himself built when first stranded on the island. He decides he cannot stay in the shelters:

He cannot stay there for he is too alone. He wishes to try again with Jack so he walks toward Castle Rock again.

After thinking on this, he realizes that Jack will never stop trying to kill him. He knows that he must escape in a different manner.

He awakes next morning to the sound of the hunters pursuing him. Ralph hides in an indentation left by the rock that killed Piggy. He does not feel safe, so he considers another escape plan. Ultimately, he feels he has the following options for escape:

He considers breaking the line, climbing a tree, or hoping they will pass. None of these are attractive alternatives for him. He decides to hide and retreats into what used to be Simon’s secret place. The fire approaches, leaving a huge curtain of smoke between the island and the sun.

Ralph runs from the hunters and the smoke. He falls in the sand. He is prepared to surrender when he looks up into the face of the naval officer who has come to his rescue.


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