In "The Outsiders", why did Randy visit Ponyboy? Did Ponyboy learn anything from Randy throughout the story?   


The Outsiders

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dswain001's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #1)

Ponyboy suffers a concussion after being beaten in the head during a rumble. In Chapter 11, Randy comes to visit him because he has missed several days from school. Randy tells Ponyboy that he came over to see how he was doing.

Still, readers can infer from Ponyboy and Randy's conversation that Randy is feeling guilty about all that has happened. It is the day before they are all to go before the judge and he is feeling pretty lousy about what transpired between the two groups. He says to Ponyboy:

"My dad says to tell the truth and nobody can get hurt. He's kind of upset about all this. I mean, my dad's a good guy and everything, better than most, and I kind of let him down, being mixed up in all this."

Readers should pay close attention to what is happening in this part of the book. According to Cherry (In Chapter 3), Socs don't feel anything. They keep up a charade of aloofness. However, by the end of the book, Randy admits to Ponyboy that he:

"..wouldn't mind getting fined, but I feel lousy about the old man.  And it's the first time I've felt anything in a long time."

mickeymouse595's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

Randy visits Ponyboy to find out how he is doing because the next day Ponyboy and Randy had to go visit the judge regardind the case of Bob getting killed. At the end he feels quite lousy and guilty about the day of when Bob had died which showed the stongness in their friendship. He wants to notify Ponyboy that his dad is a good guy and is upset about what happened but Ponyboy believes that it isn`t even Bob`s fault and he had nothing to do with the whole situation. Even if he did get fined his father was really rich and he could pay for the fine. Randy admitted that. He said that he didn`t mind getting the fine but didn't want to see his old man in a terrible mood or just plain upset.


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