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Can you please help me interpret the meaning of the following quotations taken from the...

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lee2 | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 20, 2009 at 1:35 PM via web

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Can you please help me interpret the meaning of the following quotations taken from the novel, "Mice of Men"?

Says we was here when we wasn’t.
…so I comes running…
Me an’ him goes ever’ place together.
You wasn’t big enough.

Gi’ me that mouse.
Won’t ever get canned ‘cause his old man’s the boss.
Bout half an hour ago maybe.
Maybe they’ll lock ‘im up an’ be nice to ‘im.
…you always got half or more’n half.

Might jus’ as well spen’ my time tellin’ you things…
Gi’ me that mouse!
I was only foolin’, George.
An’ if I foun’ a mouse, I could keep it.
Le’s wait till tomorra.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted July 20, 2009 at 8:59 PM (Answer #1)

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The idea and purpose of the quotations about the mouse are extremely important to understanding in the context of the novel.  For Lennie, the mouse represents something that is his own, something pure, something that sparks the development of his dreams, most notably owning the farm.  While George sees this vision as an initial delusion, throughout the course of the novel, he, too, can see this becoming a reality and there is a level of motivation that inspires, him also.  In Lennie's words about the mouse we can see that hope and dreams are present, that there is a vision of the future that allows them both to "wait till tomorra" in the idea that better things will result if they keep pursuing their dream, their hopes.  In the quotations that deal with the mouse, we see the positive ladened view of the future, in a setting that is devoid of it.  Perhaps, in Lennie's childlike innocence and in the purity of his hope, we see the worst aspects of the social order revealed when these visions are obliterated.

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