Can you give me a list of significant events throughout To Kill a Mockingbird that happened to Jem, Atticus and Scout?I need supporting evidence for each event (a quote) and how their character...

Can you give me a list of significant events throughout To Kill a Mockingbird that happened to Jem, Atticus and Scout?

I need supporting evidence for each event (a quote) and how their character developed because of the event. I mostly need Jem and Atticus! Thanks!

Asked on by beary033

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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  • Mrs. Dubose. Jem's anger about Mrs. Dubose's comments concerning Atticus gets him in trouble, and he is forced to read to her for a month or more. Jem learns about the consequences of his actions, and, without realizing it, he witnesses the old lady's courageous effort to rid herself of her morphine habit. Atticus tells Jem that "I wanted you to see what real courage is..."
  • His Lost Pants.  Jem understands that only Boo could have mended the pants that he left behind on the fence. This event causes Jem to realize that Boo means no harm and wants to be their friend. "... he coulda cut my throat from ear to ear that night but he tried to mend my pants instead..."


  • Missionary Circle Tea.  Scout sees the hypocrisy in some of the actions of the supposed "ladies" at the tea. She also witnesses the composure of Miss Maudie and Aunt Alexandra after they receive the news of Tom's death; they return to the tea as if nothing has happened. Scout emulates their actions, one of her first deliberate attempts to behave like a lady. "After all, if Aunty could be a lady at a time like this, so could I."


  • Taking the Case.  Atticus decides to defend Tom Robinson, knowing it is a lost cause and recognizing that it may bring trouble to him and his family. "But do you think I could face my children otherwise?"
  • Ol' One Shot.  Atticus picks up a gun again for the first time in 30 years, putting a bullet between the eyes of a mad dog. It shows Jem and Scout that Atticus has hidden talents and a humble nature. Jem happily declares that "Atticus is a gentleman, just like me!"
  • The Trial.  It is one of the two main plots in the novel, and it is Atticus' shining moment. He proves that Tom is innocent of the charges, but the jury sees it another way. Tom's appreciative supporters honor Atticus by standing as he leaves the courtroom. Reverend Sykes tells her, "Miss Jean Louise, stand up. Your father's passin'."


  • Meeting Dill.  Dill becomes the best friend of the children and their partner in mischief, establishing a longtime friendship. "With him, life was routine; without him, life was unbearable."
  • The Knothole.  The gifts in the knothole of the tree provide the children with a better understanding of the giver of the gifts and the cruel nature of Boo's family.
  • The Trial.  The trial of Tom Robinson, and his eventual conviction, affects the children in different ways. Both of the children see that a jury is not always just, but Jem is particularly upset. "How could they do it, how could they?"
  • Bob's Attack.  The climax of the novel, the children survive the attack, and Scout gets to see her fantasy come true: She meets Boo and escorts him back to his house. "If Miss Stephanie Crawford was watching from her upstairs window, she would see Arthur Radley escorting me down the sidewalk, as any gentleman would do."

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