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Can somebody please give me a character description of Dr Grimsby Roylott from "The...

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whydidthathappen | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 13, 2009 at 4:33 AM via web

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Can somebody please give me a character description of Dr Grimsby Roylott from "The Adventures of the Speckled Band"  with some quotes?

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted October 29, 2009 at 4:07 PM (Answer #1)

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Dr Grimesby Roylott is a violent, aggressive and intimidating character-

he is a man of immense strength, and absolutely uncontrollable in his anger.

He was very antisocial and unpopular

 He had no friends at all save the wandering gipsies.

 Roylott was also known to be physically violent towards his stepdaughters -

 Holmes pushed back the frill of black lace which fringed the hand that lay upon our visitor's knee. Five little livid spots, the marks of four fingers and a thumb, were printed upon the white wrist.

"You have been cruelly used," said Holmes.

The lady coloured deeply and covered over her injured wrist. "He is a hard man," she said, "and perhaps he hardly knows his own strength."

Physically, Roylott is intimidating and threatening as his first encounter with Holmes testifies –

 A large face, seared with a thousand wrinkles, burned yellow with the sun, and marked with every evil passion, was turned from one to the other of us, while his deep-set, bile-shot eyes, and his high, thin, fleshless nose, gave him somewhat the resemblance to a fierce old bird of prey.

 Roylott is verbally contemptuous of those around him, particularly Holmes

 "Holmes, the Scotland Yard Jack-in-office!"

 He is not afraid to assert his own strength, even in front of as estimable a man as Holmes -

 He stepped swiftly forward, seized the poker, and bent it into a curve with his huge brown hands.

 The manner of Roylott’s death – a plan of his own design – is unpleasant and finally fells the formidable character

 His chin was cocked upward and his eyes were fixed in a dreadful, rigid stare at the corner of the ceiling.

 Holmes feels ‘indirectly responsible’ for Roylott’s death but is not aggrieved –

'I cannot say that it is likely to weigh very heavily upon my conscience.'

 

 

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shoaibimranrafi | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted October 15, 2012 at 12:08 PM (Answer #2)

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The villain in our story. Grimesby's character is plagued with the hereditary violence characteristic of the Roylott men. His stepdaughter believes that Grimesby's long residence in the hot, tropical climate of India has exacerbated his natural violent
streak, making him completely impossible to get along with. Notably, Grimesby's only friends are a wandering troupe of gypsies and some exotic, dangerous animals he imports from India. Although Grimesby comes from a noble line, he is not much
concerned with his reputation. In fact, Grimesby takes pleasure in terrorizing the local villagers on a regular basis.
Nonetheless, Grimesby Roylott's character is a fascinating window into the history of British nobility. Through this character we learn that noble families are not expected to work, and thus if their family fortunes are depleted - as the Roylott's was by irresponsible heirs - then they are doomed to spend their lives in genteel poverty.
Roylott showed independence and initiative by becoming a doctor and working for a living. But he's quick to give up his day job when his wife's untimely death leaves him enough money to live comfortably without working another day. The prospect of
losing this income is what motivates him to kill his stepdaughters.
Arthur Conan Doyle, a doctor himself, reveals his understanding of the power doctors have over life and death. In making Dr. Roylott the villain, Conan Doyle presents us with the following comment, made by Sherlock Holmes: "'When a doctor does go
wrong, he is the first of criminals.'" (Section 6, pg. 120)

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shoaibimranrafi | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted October 15, 2012 at 12:50 PM (Answer #3)

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Character sketch of Dr. Grimesby Roylott:
Note: confirm Grimesby pronunciation and spelling…….
Note for the reader: Nothing has been copied from the internet or any other source of information.
The villain in our story. Grimesby's character is plagued with the hereditary violence characteristic of the Roylott men. His stepdaughter believes that Grimesby's long residence in the hot, tropical climate of India has exacerbated his natural violent streak, making him completely impossible to get along with. Notably, Grimesby's only friends are a wandering troupe of gypsies and some exotic, dangerous animals he
imports from India. Although Grimesby comes from a noble line, he is not much concerned with his reputation. In fact, Grimesby takes pleasure in terrorizing the local villagers on a regular basis.

Nonetheless, Grimesby Roylott's character is a fascinating window into the history of
British nobility. In making Dr. Roylott the villain, Conan Doyle presents us
with the following comment, made by Sherlock Holmes: "'When a doctor does go
wrong, he is the first of criminals.'"
Physically, Roylott is intimidating and threatening as his first encounter with Holmes testifies –A large face, seared with a thousand wrinkles, burned yellow with the sun, and marked with every evil passion, was turned from one to the other of us, while his deep-set, bile-shot eyes, and his high, thin, fleshless nose, gave him somewhat the resemblance to a fierce old bird of prey.
Dr Grimesby Roylott is a violent, aggressive and intimidating character as mentioned by Miss Helen stoner, “he is a man of immense strength, and absolutely uncontrollable in his anger.”
There can’t be a least doubt that he was also very antisocial and unpopular as confirmed by miss Stoner, “He had no friends at all save the wandering gypsies.”
“Mr. Sharp” or Dr.Roylott was also known to be physically violent towards his stepdaughters, as when Holmes pushed back the frill of black lace which fringed the hand that lay upon their visitor's knee. Five little livid spots, the marks of four fingers and a thumb, were printed upon the white wrist as a result of which the lady coloured deeply, covered over her injured wrist and said that he was a hard man and perhaps he hardly knew his strength when Holmes said that she had been cruelly used.
Roylott is verbally contemptuous of those around him, particularly Holmes as once he called Holmes, "Holmes, the Scotland Yard Jack-in-office!"
It should also not be forgotten that He is not afraid to assert his own strength, even in front of as estimable a man as Holmes – for in his short, humorous meeting with Holmes, he stepped swiftly forward, seized the poker, and bent it into a curve with his huge brown hands.
The manner of Roylott’s death – a plan of his own design – is unpleasant and finally fells the formidable character as described by Watson that his chin was cocked upward and his eyes were fixed in a dreadful, rigid stare at the corner of the ceiling.
Conclusively, Holmes considered himself indirectly responsible for Roylott’s death but is not aggrieved – for he believed that it was unlikely to weigh very heavily upon his conscience.

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