Homework Help

Can all neutralization reactions between a strong acid and a strong base be described...

user profile pic

claymore | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted December 10, 2012 at 8:13 PM via web

dislike 1 like

Can all neutralization reactions between a strong acid and a strong base be described by the net ionic equation of H+ (aq) + OH- (aq) --> H2O (l)?

Please explain.

If the above net ionic equation is incorrect, then what could be the correct net ionic equation?

Can this example work?

EX: 2H+ (aq) + 2A- (aq) + B+ (aq) + OH- (aq) --> H3O+ (aq) + BA (aq)

1 Answer | Add Yours

user profile pic

jerichorayel | College Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted December 11, 2012 at 3:26 AM (Answer #1)

dislike 1 like

The above net ionic equation is correct.

H+(aq) + OH- (aq) --> H2O (l)

 

We only have to elaborate this for confirmation. Let me give you a similar example for this.

The reaction of Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) and Hydrochloric acid (HCl) forming NaCl and water can be written as follows:

NaOH + HCl ---> NaCl + H2O

**we put the proper notation to each of them.

NaOH (aq) + HCl (aq) ---> NaCl(aq) + H2O (l)

**next, we rewrite aqueous solution (aq) showing their ionic components.

Na+(aq)+OH-(aq)+H+(aq)+Cl-(aq) -> Na+(aq)+Cl-(aq)+H2O(l)

**then by removing the spectator ions, we will have the final net ionic equation.

H+(aq) + OH- (aq) --> H2O (l)

which is your original answer :)

 

 

Sources:

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes