Homework Help

What could you do to end someone's action or behavior if you were not constrained by...

user profile pic

sandy2313 | Student, College Freshman | (Level 2) Honors

Posted August 31, 2013 at 5:50 PM via web

dislike 1 like

What could you do to end someone's action or behavior if you were not constrained by morals, ethics, or the law about the action or behavior that you find particularly annoying and are powerless to change? In this context, why are laws needed, and what are the social goals that contemporary law serves?

1 Answer | Add Yours

Top Answer

user profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 31, 2013 at 6:15 PM (Answer #1)

dislike 0 like

The main social goal served by contemporary law is the goal of allowing people to live together peacefully even though they have no relationships, either familial or personal, with one another.  Laws are needed because we live in a densely populated society in which we cannot regulate behavior or settle disagreements without having formalized laws.

I suppose that an action that I find annoying and am powerless to change is the propensity of young people to use bad language in public, regardless of whether they are around children.  While I personally do not object to the use of bad language, I do think that people should not use it around children.  However, there is really nothing that I can do about it when it happens in public places.

If I were not constrained by morals or laws, I could take physical action to stop the young people from using bad language.  I could do something like painting swear words all over their car or their house.  I could, if I were particularly lacking in morals, shoot them for using such language.

This shows why laws are necessary.  If I acted in these ways, it would lead to something like Hobbes’s war of each against all.  I would act, then my victims or their relatives would seek revenge and chaos would ensue.  To prevent this, we need laws.

Sources:

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes